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Nov
27
revised To include a resource ID in the payload or to derive from URI
mention create as possible, but discouraged, use-case.
Nov
27
answered To include a resource ID in the payload or to derive from URI
Nov
25
comment What does the Apache licensing mean by “Permitted: Commercial Use”
@Pacerier: If you mean making money of the project itself rather than using the project in other money making activity, even GPL leaves you some options. You must only provide source for what is linked to the GPL code and shipped. So you can 1. open it and live off support contract or related services (e.g. open client for paid service), 2. provide software as a service (so you don't ship anything; but watch out for AGPL which binds source distribution with use), 3. put the open and closed code in separate process or 4. use GPL code for build only.
Nov
25
comment What does the Apache licensing mean by “Permitted: Commercial Use”
@Pacerier: In the sense of this question, “use for commercial purpose” means you use it on your work computer or server. GPL permits that and the linked site clearly says so.
Nov
25
comment How to break up a programming project into tasks for other developers?
If team members talk to each other, occasional conflict (in version control sense) can be solved easily. The daily stand-up meeting helps this.
Nov
21
comment How to break these long C++ lines in a neat way?
@Panzercrisis: Given modern monitors and IDEs 80 columns still makes a lot of sense because 1) the IDEs usually have a lot of junk to the sides and 2) because you often need to compare two bits of code side-by-side. In those cases people with good sight and thus small font will fit perhaps 100 characters, but people with worse sight who need bigger font will struggle to fit even 80.
Nov
20
comment Writing generic code when your target is a C compiler
@DavidCary: Sure I did. But the point is it is (runtime) polymorphic, not generic.
Nov
13
revised Should we add constructors to structs
added 10 characters in body
Nov
12
awarded  Enlightened
Nov
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
11
answered Should we add constructors to structs
Nov
11
comment Should we add constructors to structs
@StevenBurnap: If the constructor does anything more than just setting field values in basic ways it is only more appropriate to have it. Even on a struct.
Nov
7
comment Must I provide my project source code if I use a library licensed under Apache 2.0?
Note that Android, except the kernel, is under Apache 2.0 license and most vendors do not provide sources of their customizations.
Nov
3
answered Alternative to printing debug information to stdout\stderr
Oct
29
answered Pair programming via mailing list
Oct
29
comment Shortest Path Between Two Nodes in a +10 Million Nodes Graph
Is it likely that the long paths usually use a limited subset of vertices ("key ideas")? If yes, then you could probably adapt some of the techniques used for road networks. This research group in Karlsruhe provides papers describing some methods and you can find more via their references. You don't have to identify the key vertices; the contraction hierarchy or highway hierarchy algorithms will do it themselves if the graph is sufficiently non-homogenous.
Oct
29
comment Should I store images in my database or file system in this application?
Advantage of having images in filesystem is that you can serve them from separate box with some lighter-weight (and consequently faster) server like nginx or lighttpd. But of course it opens room for consistency problems.
Oct
21
comment Robustness and pointer safety in C++
@Muton: As I said, you can catch null (invalid) pointer access in C++. With structural exceptions on Windows and signals on Unix. Use-after-free and buffer overruns are worse as they usually just return garbage; most can be eliminated by using proper containers instead of raw pointers.
Oct
21
comment Robustness and pointer safety in C++
@msw: I haven't had a pointer error in my code in years and in the codebase as a whole we had a couple and they came up in the first test and were quickly fixed. With proper use of constructors, destructors and smart pointers, they are not likely any more. And we don't even have C++11, only boost. What we do have problems with is thread synchronization, but that's a problem in Java and C# too.
Oct
21
comment Robustness and pointer safety in C++
Oh, and of course you can handle null pointer exceptions in C++, though it is operating system dependent.