2,243 reputation
31123
bio website shivansite.wordpress.com
location Forgotten Realms
age
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen 18 hours ago

Card Name: Shivan Dragon

Mana Cost: 4x neutral + 2x red

Types: Creature — Dragon, Flying

Abilities: Tap one Red land: Shivan Dragon gets +1/+0 until end of turn.

Rarity: rare


Aug
3
comment Why isn't Java used for modern web application development?
I think the issue here is that Java has been somewhat outgunned by other technologies when it comes down to creating strictly the UI part of the web-app. Doing it in JS, with some of the new frameworks (like Angular) is a lot simpler (and more natural) than doing it with Java EE's Web UI technologies (JSP, JSF, etc). On the server-side of a web app, Java still holds strong.
Jul
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
24
answered Is template “metaprogramming” in Java a good idea?
Jun
19
answered Is it beneficial to study past the basics of a core language when the primary goal is to rely on its framework?
May
7
awarded  Good Question
Apr
30
answered MongoDB: Replicate data in documents vs. “join”
Apr
19
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
18
comment Would a “downcast if block” be a reasonable language feature?
@ratchetfreak but couldn't this potentially throw a InvalidCastException ?
Apr
16
comment Why returning XML/JSON for API requests, can't we just directly process request and return the modified web page (HTML/CSS/JS)?
If nothing else, think of how bandwith-wasteful that is. Why would you want to keep (re)transfering parts of the UI via network (and possibly in an uncompressed-text form) when the only part that changes is the data? Why force the user to witness the complete reload of a complicated web-page in his/her browser, when you only need to change a small part of it (like the weather update in the corner of a news page) ?
Apr
4
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
12
comment Is “Hiring only the Best” a really practical advice for normal desktop application programming?
@quickly_now I've also worked with really good programmers who were in no way passionate or enthusiastic about the project and chose instead to parade their general knowledge of programming instead of actually solving any real problem. They were a deadweight too. Depending on the project, after a certain point, the technical knowledge / programming aptitudes of someone working on it become kind of moot. However the fact of being passionate and enthusiastic about it doesn't have such issues: the more you have it, the better it is for everyone.
Mar
11
comment Is it bad practice to allow user defined fields?
How about just using a database that accepts multivalued fields, like Mongo, Lucene, etc, and avoid having n relationships between a "main" entry and it's n attributes? Yes in theory you could have a certain attribute common to two different entities, and these relationships would save you a bit of disk space this way, but your performance would degrade fast after a certain point.
Mar
8
comment What makes the difference between “Hire” and an honest “almost” for final on-site interviews?
@kevincline agreed, it was me who said it :)
Mar
7
comment What makes the difference between “Hire” and an honest “almost” for final on-site interviews?
There are two completly different points here: one is that schooling (at least in the young field that programming still is today) is useless. So yes, I find it normal that real software companies realised that they shouldn't care too much about that. The other point is that there's a limit to what you can do/understand. I'm sorry but (granted) based on empirical data, that's crap. And I think serious companies actually check whether the candidate knows/understands something ALREADY, and don't really go on the assumption they he/she will therefore NEVER know/understand that thing.
Mar
5
comment Why is verbosity bad for a programming language?
@NathanLong agreed,from this point of view(of a beginner specifically learning how to do a very simple example)it's easier to learn "puts "hello"" than it is to understand all those 12 lines of code needed in Java/C/C++/ObjectiveC/C# to do the same thing. However from the perspective of someone who's not familiar with either of those languages,I think the Java-like syntax,albeit more verbose,gives better hints at to what the code is supposed to do,as opposed to the Ruby version. Just a matter of opinion,I just think that verbosity can sometimes be useful,it's not always something to frown upon
Mar
3
comment Why is verbosity bad for a programming language?
I'm sorry, but in the most sincere way possible, to me "System.out.print..." is tons more descriptive as to what the line does (prints something on the console) as compared to "puts" (which sounds more like the basic-like variable initialisation via "let"). Also the fact that it's in a function called main is more suggestive to the fact that it's a line of code that will be executed when the program is ran (as opposed to just a floating line of code which may as well be part of a library, or some stray code that's never executed).
Feb
15
answered 'Game loop' in a non-game application?
Feb
14
answered Algorithm for searching images within images
Feb
12
comment How to make it obvious that a function is being accessed from the outside?
That's an excellent question. My solution (with which I'm not at all too happy, that's why I'm only putting it in a comment) is to make multiple header files, sensibly named, and grouping functions on the scope I want them to have. For the AStar library I've made i have AStar.h, AStar_private.h, AStar_packagePrivate.h, etc...