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seen Sep 23 at 15:25

Oct
11
awarded  Yearling
Jan
30
comment How can I convince cowboy programmers to use source control?
I would like to add that this is not even an attitude issue. This is a management issue. Any software/embedded design manager SHOULD know the inherent dangers from a lack of source control and should take steps to remedy this. The server should be locked down to read-only for direct user access, and only checkins accepted. If merges are 'difficult' perhaps they have chosen the wrong career. There is a difference between a hack and a professional. That all being said, see if they'd be more apt to use something other than TFS. Its what I'm forced into right now as well, and it's not my favorite.
Jan
30
comment What should an embedded developer know on day one?
Very good answer. I'll add a couple more thoughts. You sometimes need to check the efficiency of the techniques used. Some ways of implementing algorithms will consume more flash space, some will consume too much processing power. At some point you will meet hardware, and you need to define and analyze the needs of those interfaces carefully. Avoid fancier C++ options to maintain efficiency, like multiple inheritance, STL, etc. Using C-like techniques can often be more efficient. You'll sometimes need to optimize in order to reclaim hundreds of bytes to add a bugfix. Good luck.
Jan
27
comment How can I defend Ruby on Rails against customers' not technical opinion?
I would point out something that is hedged a bit in this answer: Your customer may be right. It may not be the technically superior answer, but as is pointed out his concerns may be valid, and RoR could fizzle and die, however unlikely it seems. It is certainly good to provide your technical opinion, as a customer needs it to make an informed decision as well.
Jan
5
answered How do I deal with a dead-end job?
Jan
5
answered When is the right time to change programming language?
Oct
28
answered To what extent can choosing a particular job limit future opportunities?
Oct
26
answered What language should be used to teach object-oriented design and development in university?
Oct
26
comment What's the best way to learn code if you are just starting out?
I agree with Python. It is a very powerful language and you can accomplish a lot with it. C is exactly as tdammers stated.. very close to the hardware, very powerful, and very easy to shoot yourself in the foot with. Probably not a great first language, but certainly worth learning later. (No experience with JS). I would recommend you come up with little programs to write..the smaller the better in the beginning. If you're at all into math, I would recommend projecteuler.net which will also teach lessons about computer/language limitations. Good luck!
Oct
21
answered How can we plan projects realistically while accounting for support issues?
Oct
21
comment Is a degree needed for low-level/embedded programming jobs?
I've been doing embedded design/programming for 12 years. This is pretty much exactly how I would answer the question as well. I will point out that there are embedded coders who just put out basic C or C++ code for the job, and then there are designers who work on the algorithms, architecture of the software, and interface/setup more complex hardware. Those areas may require a lot more work and study for someone new to some of the concepts. All that said, I've met great and terrible embedded programmers, some with a formal education, and some not.
Oct
18
awarded  Teacher
Oct
11
awarded  Supporter