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comment Is A Language-Integrated Build System Generally Desirable?
Take a look at the conceptual work in the 1980s on Ada Programming Support Environments.
Jul
1
comment Improve bisection method or alternate algorithm for efficient determination of text font size to fit in a box
@Thalia, Mandrill's answer describes the false position method. The modified false position method is a variation on the theme. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/False_position_method for more information. (This is why you wanted to take the numerical methods class, although, come to think of it, false position methods are not usually taught these days.)
Jul
1
comment Improve bisection method or alternate algorithm for efficient determination of text font size to fit in a box
Bisection requires that you have the final solution bracketed, but otherwise assumes nothing about the form of the solution. If you know something about the form of the solution, you also have a way of estimating where to look for the solution. Use that to guess your new font, rather than just bisecting, and iterate, and you have what numerical analysis people call the "false position method". (Note: Hamming's "modified false position method" is better. Newton's method is far better, but you don't have the derivative available.)
Jul
1
comment Improve bisection method or alternate algorithm for efficient determination of text font size to fit in a box
The relationship between font "size" and font width may not actually be linear, but it will be approximately linear.
Jun
24
comment Designing advanced n-body physics that lead to a stable state
The closest thing I've ever heard to this is Sussman's Digital Orrery project at MIT (csail.mit.edu/timeline/timeline.php?query=event&id=359). They used it to show that the long-term motion of Pluto is chaotic. That seems to suggest that what you want may not be possible.
Jun
23
comment What is the best aproach for coding in a slow compilation environment
@MikeDunlavey: Well, DUHHH! Think about it. The compiler has to read in every character of every source and include file. That means it has to go out to the disk fairly often, move the head, wait for the head to move, wait for the disk to spin around to the sector of interest, read the sector of interest at a rate determined by the magnetic density of the disk and the angular rate of the disk, possibly repeat the whole process because that sector read was to find out where the REAL sector of interest is on the disk... Disk I/O is freaking EXPENSIVE.
Jun
23
comment Has there been recent research on Fred Brooks's model of the “Surgical Software Team”?
This was the "Chief Programmer Team" concept, originally described by Harlan Mills in 1971. Brooks picked it up. The fundamental issue was that what Mills called a "chief programmer" is what others call a superprogrammer, a Dennis Ritchie, and those kinds of programmers are just not all that common. Remember, 50% of EVERYTHING, including programmers, falls below the median.
Jun
15
comment How to translate from a programming language to another?
Have you considered embedding your DSL in LISP, instead of hacking up Yet Another Ill-Considered C Lookalike?
Jun
8
answered Audio driver which filters outgoing sound out of incoming
Jun
5
comment Which SPDX license is equivalent to 'All Rights Reserved'?
"all rights reserved", in that context, means EXACTLY what it says. NO permissions have been given. It is a legal term of art. Think of it as a magickal incantation that must be uttered in precisely that form to invoke the Law Demons.
Jun
3
comment How can I map a number of points of a polygon to matching points of a larger rectangle?
There is an ancient proverb that says "One picture is worth a thousand words." This would seem to be one of the times where that observation is appropriate.
Jun
1
comment Is byte stuffing required when using a packet field length
@supercat: The question was about a protocol for data to be transmitted via TCP. TCP provides a reliable medium for payload data. That was one of the specific requirements for its design, back in the 1970s.
May
12
comment Is 25% to me as sole author a good deal?
@Bobson: +1000 if I could.
May
12
comment GPLing an implementation of a patented algorithm
There's a flip side that you may not have considered. It is POSSIBLE that the paper published ten years ago constitutes prior art which would invalidate their patent. If someone else wrote that paper, whatever it disclosed may not have been theirs to patent. You REALLY need to consult a patent attorney on this one.
May
12
comment What is the most efficient / fastest way to keep a list in order?
@JamesJackson, upvoted it for you.
May
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
23
comment Is it common to print out code on paper?
@user1249: It was the photon torpedo routine from the Matuszek-Reynolds-McGehearty-Cohen "STARTRK" ("Star Trek") game. It was written in FORTRAN IV. It had to parse the command, simulate the flight of either one or three photon torpedoes (possibly aborting if a misfire occurred), with perturbations, AND set up a stack to do 8-way connectivity of stars going nova when torpedo'ed or being adjacent to a star going nova, and killing off any Klingons adjacent to said stars. FORTRAN IV did not do recursion, and there just wasn't any way to factor it that didn't make it worse.
Apr
23
revised How does multitasking work
Add "priority inversions" to incomplete list of bad stuff.
Apr
10
comment Is there a license that prohibits code share and using outside the company?
You need to consult an attorney on this one.
Apr
7
comment Has pre-increment operators become that common?
Historical background: The postincrement and predecrement operators have their roots in the PDP-11 indirect addressing modes. The addressing modes were designed that way SPECIFICALLY to facilitate operand stack PUSH/POP operations, stack-based subroutine call/return, and immediate operands (using postincrement on the program counter). C provided those cases to make it easy to generate tight code for computers with (by 21st century standards) microscopic memories. Later, they were generalized. I never see preincrement or postdecrement operators used.