544 reputation
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location Poland
age 28
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Nov 13 at 21:19

Oct
23
awarded  Yearling
Feb
2
awarded  Guru
Jan
18
comment Descriptive naming vs. 80 character lines
@BillyONeal: most screens can do 120, but hardly any can do 240. Or do you never compare diffs?
Jan
14
comment C++ on Windows vs Linux - common issues?
/etc is standard place for configuration only for system-wide services or network services. User applications should keep their stuff in .(name-of-app)/ or .config/name-of-app/ in user home directory.
Jan
14
comment Asking people to disable Java for security - what's next for developer?
@tunmisefasipe: if you go with this, you should uninstall Silverlight and (in many cases) .NET. Regular home users hardly need any of those technologies. Doesn't change the fact that both of them have a place where they excel at.
Jan
13
comment Do higher resolution laptop displays matter for programmers?
Oh, and for their marketing claims, if you assume 20/20 vision, then iPhone's 5 326ppi at 10 inches, iPad's 3 264ppi at 15 inches and MBP with Retina's 220ppi at 20 inches is above your retina resolution.
Jan
13
comment Do higher resolution laptop displays matter for programmers?
What basic physics say otherwise?! You have more pixels that take the same amount of physical space. You draw stuff assuming the same physical space (before the letters were supposed to be 3mm in height on screen, now they have to be too 3mm in height). If you're using a toolkit (Qt, GTK) that is DPI aware and the OS reports correct DPI for the screen, the whole application will look good. Not Apple's fault that programmers use shit toolkits to make their applications.
Jan
13
comment Do higher resolution laptop displays matter for programmers?
@Shauna: yes, you're correct, but I wanted to underline that DPI-awerness is not thanks to X server but an effect of interaction between toolkit (Qt, GTK) and how it's used/configured (usually by the desktop environment).
Jan
13
comment Do higher resolution laptop displays matter for programmers?
they look good because they're using higher DPI setting to draw fonts and icons, not because your holding them much closer
Jan
13
comment Do higher resolution laptop displays matter for programmers?
@AndrewFinnell in Display settings you can change the effective DPI of applications, so you're not constrained to effective 1440x900 even with stock OSX. And yes it is worth it, every OS (Win, OSX, KDE, Gnome) are more-or-less resolution independent. If the text is unreadable because it's too small just increase the DPI. It's quite irritating seeing people assume that 96dpi is the One True DPI™.
Jan
12
comment Computer science jobs that don't let you develop software outside of that job?
+1 for the unenforeability of "can't program for life". When the contract ends and they stop paying the money, the relationship ends. You can't enforce your laws on them and they can't enforce any clauses on you. It's that simple (there are few exceptions in form of NDAs, but those are the exception, not the rule).
Jan
7
awarded  Good Answer
Jan
7
comment Should your best programmers have to check everyone else's code into source control?
@Telastyn: I don't know better, I haven't worked in your environment. On the other hand I do work with git and svn -- the source control systems @GlenPeterson asked specifically. I also tried managing branches and changesets with svn and it was a nightmare, with git I actually commonly go back and fix patches I committed only locally. Distributed version control has a completely different mindset to it.
Jan
7
comment Should your best programmers have to check everyone else's code into source control?
@Telastyn: The question is more of a "when" than "if". Rollbacks and refactoring of whole patch series in git are easy, that's one of the main uses of rebase command. I have a repo with something like 8 feature branches, updating (rebasing) them after there are changes in upstream take literally a minute, even if my previous multiple patches were merged as a single commit.
Jan
7
revised Should your best programmers have to check everyone else's code into source control?
added 93 characters in body
Jan
7
comment Should your best programmers have to check everyone else's code into source control?
How they are blocked? You create a patch (commit locally), submit it upstream, and keep working on new widget (create new local commits). If your change is applied verbatim you just need checkout and merge the lead's repo. If it wasn't applied verbatim you can still rebase your later work. If the change is really critical, you can publish it in your own public repo and tell people to checkout it from there or just send them patches. In this case git will detect that a change was already made and just skip applying the specific upstream patch.
Jan
7
comment Should your best programmers have to check everyone else's code into source control?
@Andrew with git any developer can have his own repo (on his personal computer) and a public personal repo (the one on a server, behind apache) that he can only add changes to. The difference is, that only the lead developers repo is the "blessed one", the one from which everyone should checkout from. The lead checkouts code from developer's public repos and merges them to his public repo. You both have known/controlled iteration as well as source control at all times.
Jan
7
comment Should your best programmers have to check everyone else's code into source control?
From what you're describing seems that the environment you worked in used a centralized repo. The question is more about distributed model, git specifically.
Jan
7
answered Should your best programmers have to check everyone else's code into source control?
Jan
7
awarded  Commentator