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visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Oct 18 '13 at 19:18

I'm a developer, but you already knew that.

I love to write great software and work with great developers. I know .NET inside and out, but I also spend quite a bit of time in Java and JavaScript.

I'm always up for learning something new.


Aug
13
comment Does Fred Brooks' “Surgical Team” effectively handle the bus factor?
Thanks for the answer. Already, this experience is definitely revealing two weaknesses of our team: 1) our core codebase is too large, and needs more modularization, and 2) when we do modularize more, other developers need to take the lead of the new components, instead of me. The larger issue, that isn't necessarily part of my original question, is that I have a far larger knowledge of the code than the manager (who is the "official" surgeon), so he isn't delegating effectively as he could imo.
Aug
13
accepted Does Fred Brooks' “Surgical Team” effectively handle the bus factor?
Aug
13
revised Does Fred Brooks' “Surgical Team” effectively handle the bus factor?
added 12 characters in body
Aug
13
comment Does Fred Brooks' “Surgical Team” effectively handle the bus factor?
Thanks for the answer, I definitely do agree that one person doing all the work is a high risk and that the manager is aware of that. In this case, however, I am not doing all the work. The other team members are very productive when working on other tasks, such as fixing bugs and working on subcomponents - not the core system architecture. Would be somewhat similar to suggesting to someone on the Windows Media Player team at MS to make changes to the Windows kernel.
Aug
13
revised Does Fred Brooks' “Surgical Team” effectively handle the bus factor?
deleted 30 characters in body; edited title
Aug
13
asked Does Fred Brooks' “Surgical Team” effectively handle the bus factor?
Aug
10
answered If your algorithm is correct, does it matter how long it took you to write it?
Jul
24
comment How do I go from “here's the zip” to a good release strategy?
Suggested reading for production-ready software: pragprog.com/book/mnee/release-it
Jul
11
answered Storing IEnumerable as instance variable - is it a code smell to expect it to change?
Jun
15
answered Web workflow solution - how should I approach the design?
Jun
14
comment C# foreach improvements?
A for loop is only suitable if the count is readily accessible and retrieving the count is non-expensive. For example, if you are enumerating over an IEnumerable<T> that is orchestrated by yield return, getting the count may not be possible, easy, or reproducible (iterating a second time may have a different result). @KeithS's solution is OK but I would agree with @Phil that it is a kludge. Having an index and manually incrementing it really isn't so bad, and is easy to read.
Jun
14
awarded  Critic
Jun
13
revised Why should I declare a class as an abstract class?
added 678 characters in body
Jun
13
revised Why should I declare a class as an abstract class?
added 678 characters in body
Jun
13
revised Why should I declare a class as an abstract class?
added 678 characters in body
Jun
13
answered Why should I declare a class as an abstract class?
May
23
comment Dependency injection: How to sell it
+1 for growing along with the project and "don't call it DI"
May
21
comment Is it safe to use CamelCased file names?
Why not follow the Microsoft Model and unnecessarily put spaces in the names: "C:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Web Server Extensions\12\bin" Sysadmins will love you for that one! :-P
Apr
27
revised Is it inefficient to concatenate strings one at a time?
Made final paragraph less trashy.
Apr
27
awarded  Nice Answer