128 reputation
6
bio website github.com/stoive
location Sydney, Australia
age 26
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen Sep 26 '13 at 6:06

May
10
comment Dynamic typing across the whole technology stack - where to enforce data validity?
Ahh, I think you've understood what I'm trying to ask! Enforcing business rules - an SQL database enforces some of them through the schema, and a strongly-typed OO language helps enforce them through all the classes you have to create. Guess I just need to be less lazy, and just write some lines in my code to do this :p
May
10
comment Dynamic typing across the whole technology stack - where to enforce data validity?
Mongoose looks interesting... certainly along the lines of what I'm looking for.
May
10
comment Dynamic typing across the whole technology stack - where to enforce data validity?
Now I understand that in trying to express this question, I've muddled the concepts of 'data type' and 'data schema'. The question is about schemas. static OO languages (Java, C#) impose a schema via your class definitions of business types. SQL can also provide this via its DB schema. But a fully-dynamic, no-SQL stack has neither of these, leaving validation to in-code checks, which I guess I've lived without before.
May
10
comment Dynamic typing across the whole technology stack - where to enforce data validity?
I have no problem at all with writing in dynamically typed languages, and I'm definitely not keen on imposing type systems on them. The problem is that "check before you go, only for what you need, ignore the rest" by nature tends to be clunky, imperative code. At least SQL-backed databases/static OO languages imposed a 'schema' (in the relational/OO realms, respectively), but nothing in the newer stack described above intrinsically contain any schema validation.
May
10
comment Dynamic typing across the whole technology stack - where to enforce data validity?
I guess I should make it clear that yes, I understand that flexibility of structure is a main advantage of JSON-based databases, and also JSON-based data encoding broadly. Though it should still be important that, given the current time/context, you're at least receiving and storing correct data, yes?
Apr
20
comment I can't draw. How can I make polished applications?
I think the font colour/background colour thing is heading down the right path here. The contrast thing was one of the first items I got public feedback for from the first site I ever published. Maybe some other tips, like how to choose/apply colour - how many? One or two? More? Light or dark? Put it in the headings? Borders? Background? All/none/some of the above?
Apr
19
comment I can't draw. How can I make polished applications?
To elaborate - I have convinced a client on hiring a graphic designer before (UI design I'm okay, graphics I'm horrendous), by stating that good visuals project confidence and trustworthiness onto the users. In this case, the client was already paying (their ideas, I was just coding), but in other circumstances you need to convey confidence and trustworthiness to the clients before you get to touch any money for graphic design resources. Or, as per the OP (hobby projects?), money will never be involved - hiring a designer isn't feasible, yet presentation is still important.
Apr
19
comment I can't draw. How can I make polished applications?
So, pay someone to do it, or get hitched to someone who can do it for free? :p. What if it's too early to pay a designer - proof of concept, or trying out the functionality? There needs to be minimal aesthetic attention put to the software, lest the people I demonstrate my software to get distracted by gawdy colours and fonts that I don't know how to do better for.
Feb
28
comment Java editor/IDE for beginners?
My university introduced students to programming via BlueJ. It was certainly helpful at a time when I found Eclipse baffling.
Nov
30
comment Avoiding new operator in JavaScript — the better way
+1 It seems odd to wrangle a language around one's bad coding habits. Surely some syntax highlighting/check-in policy can enforce avoidance of bug-prone patterns/probable typos.