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seen Jun 12 at 13:41

May
4
comment Security Concerns with password storage in Scripting Languages (VBA)
@HariSeldon Good idea, sometimes it is hard to balance these things. And sometimes you can't; that is part of the fun of figuring this stuff out though. :)
Apr
18
comment Designing an API on top with Java RMI and Rest APIs
I think it depends on what you are doing. Obviously you wouldn't re-write a whole API. But the chances that you would actually use every feature a vendor API has is pretty slim. So, you can wrap what you are using and ignore what you aren't. This is especially helpful if the vendor API is complex or archaic. You can minimize your interactions with it, which is handy when these interactions can be error prone.
Mar
14
comment Javascript naming conventions
I don't necessarily buy using the notation as "breaking" the loosely typed aspects of the language. Sure, you would have to change the name when you are changing the type, but that would be a good thing to do anyway so you can track what you are doing. I know there are aspects of it that are ugly. But, if you've ever worked in a LARGE (I'm talking hundreds of thousands of lines of code) project in a loosely typed language, it can help you find your way faster in certain instances. Saying it's dated, etc really doesn't address the core issue the OP was trying to slove.
Dec
23
comment Would you rather make private stuff internal/public for tests, or use some kind of hack like PrivateObject?
@flamingpenguin It might, but if you have to put ugly code somewhere, it might as well be in a unit test where it's less likely to need modification and be part of the application.
Dec
22
comment Would you rather make private stuff internal/public for tests, or use some kind of hack like PrivateObject?
I agree, this is the way to do it. Keep the ugliness in the test code, where it can't hurt anything.
Dec
9
comment Prerequisites to become a technical architect
Yes it is definitely a good idea for an architect to continue doing coding tasks. The reality is that, depending on the organization you are in, you will see much less coding as the architect role progresses. Some may not see any at all. The one nice thing is that most architects probably have enough experience and say in their day to day role that they may get to still write some code by just saying so.