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Mar
21
comment Why can't native machine code be easily decompiled?
Also see reverseengineering.stackexchange.com/questions/311/…
Jan
8
comment IPv4 to IPv6. where is IPv5?
@MichaelHampton It's almost a safe bet to say that IPv6 wont be replaced because of exhaustion :) Whatever it is called, I would have loved 64 bit addressing (instead of IPv6's current 128 scheme) which itself is difficult to exhaust. So much unused space makes me feel uneasy for some reason :)
Nov
17
comment Difference between hash and dictionary
@KonradRudolph I certainly get/got your point, just saying if designing an API now, map would be more intent revealing. The "map" construct of functional language is less of a distraction for me here. Just personal preferences. Side note: NIST also recognizes other usages like map: xlinux.nist.gov/dads
Nov
17
comment Difference between hash and dictionary
Though not necessarily, the word "dictionary" in today's world connotes an order. I prefer the term "map" for typical unordered key-value pairs.
Oct
25
comment What's the rationale behind the ordering of Scala's value/variable declaration when including a type identifier?
You can see a kind of reasoning by Brian Beckman in his tutorial "dont fear the monad": youtube.com/watch?v=ZhuHCtR3xq8 @8.30 min
Oct
21
comment Example of where Functional Programming is Superior to Imperative or Object-Oriented Programming?
On a minor note, C# code can be just mylist.Sum(i => i + 1); which I dont think anyone can argue is less readable than the given Clojure version :)
Oct
21
comment Haskell vs Erlang for web services
@Jus12 You may want to see
Oct
1
comment Interesting or unique types in programming languages?
May be show us examples :)
Oct
1
comment Why does C# have much more features than Java?
In simple terms either Java team didn't think they were important or they simply didn't have the resource to.
Oct
1
comment Why does C# have much more features than Java?
@KilianFoth ever since version 4, I can say it's Java which is a blatant rip-off (not that I agree with that usage, all languages copy from others which is a good thing) of C#. Enums, autoboxing, lambdas, varargs, annotations etc. C# coming later is not at all a reason for C# adding more features than Java. If it was, Java had plenty of time to add to itself, while C# has leapfrogged with anonymous types, extension methods, expression trees, dynamic etc, with Java very recently adding alternatives to lamdas and delegates.
Jul
12
comment Is there any programming language(s) which has mathematical number types?
As I said the question stemmed from curiosity when I was thinking of a programming languages for educational purposes for a non-programmer. Just seeing if there are really languages that high level. I'm not really adamant on it.
Jul
12
revised Is there any programming language(s) which has mathematical number types?
added 130 characters in body
Jul
12
comment Is there any programming language(s) which has mathematical number types?
What do you mean by "real and complex numbers are uncountable" ?
Jul
12
comment Is there any programming language(s) which has mathematical number types?
delnan, thanks for answering. I do realise numeric type has to have a size and operating on numbers depends on bit-ness of the number. For me size is not a requirement, let it have an upper cut off 2 ^ 32 or 2 ^ 64. So I wasn't exactly after arbitrary precision rational numbers or so. Just asking if there are computer languages which by default names its numeric types like in the mathematical world, and not int64, double, float etc which sound technical.
Jul
11
awarded  Student
Jul
11
comment Is there any programming language(s) which has mathematical number types?
Which tag says that? Sorry, havn't noticed. I'm on mobile now.
Jul
11
asked Is there any programming language(s) which has mathematical number types?
Jul
11
comment What natural language has the advantage when it comes to programming?
I have heard Sanskrit is meant to be the most like a computer language according to some study, you can google it. I am not sure how true that can be but since Sanskrit never took off as a mainstream spoken language and also since it was used among academia for technical studies of the time it's probable it's unlike the natural spoken languages of today. Turkish sounds very sweet to my ears (just aurally) but if it all it and Sanskrit talk like programming languages boy that would be very boring. The last thing I want to hear when asked: "is it boy or girl?" is "yes".
Jul
11
comment What natural language has the advantage when it comes to programming?
Chinese is APL of spoken languages you mean? :)
Jul
11
comment What is the most orthogonal programming language?
A related q: programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/180662/…