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Jul
9
awarded  Teacher
Jul
9
answered What's a good simple way to combat the n+1 problem?
Jul
19
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
31
comment Support multiple frameworks in a JavaScript library
The short answer is you can support every framework that's ever been made or ever will be made by 1) not relying on any frameworks, 2) not modifying the host environment in ways that will conflict with libraries that might also modify it (e.g. prototype.js), and 3) not trusting that the host environment hasn't been modified in naive ways (e.g. for..in without hasOwnProperty or a similar check).
Mar
31
comment Support multiple frameworks in a JavaScript library
...and the reason they don't use any GP library is to avoid issues like the one central to this question. The entire question becomes a moot point if your code does not rely on a framework / GP library. For complete applications this might be a good answer, but for libraries I'm really not sold.
Mar
31
comment Support multiple frameworks in a JavaScript library
Do you have some reference for the claim that the advice "don't build libraries on frameworks" applies to less that 1% of JS libraries? I can find many examples of scripts that don't use a GP library / framework / whatever you want to call it. Take a look at twitterjs, highlight.js, jscolor, dynarch calendar, sigma grid, etc. Whether or not they are "libraries" I suppose is open to interpretation, but there is plenty of good JS code that doesn't rely on GP libraries...
Mar
31
comment Support multiple frameworks in a JavaScript library
Out of curiosity, what features from prototype.js is your library using?
Mar
31
answered Support multiple frameworks in a JavaScript library
Mar
6
comment Is JavaScript interpreted by design?
There was a jscript.net for a while that was similar to AS3 / the "lost" ES4. It was bytecode-compiled to CIL.
Feb
21
comment Legal ramifications of use of the JavaScript trademark?
@MSalters the thing that makes it confusing to me is that Oracle doesn't even have a JavaScript engine / ECMAScript implementation / whatever. Mozilla has what's left of the Netscape reference implementation. And check out the grounds this issue was closed on... especially note the last parenthesized sentence. I feel like it's really anybody's guess as to whether the trademark holder will come after those they feel are infringing on their trademark. Probably best to cover my rear.
Feb
20
comment Legal ramifications of use of the JavaScript trademark?
Alright, I've done some poking around regarding "nominative fair use" and after reading this short PDF I feel like it may be a bit wobbly. ISTM that the best thing to do is include a disclaimer somewhere clearly stating that I am not affiliated with or endorsed by Oracle, just in case.
Feb
20
awarded  Scholar
Feb
20
accepted Trimming script size by using array notation for frequently accessed properties
Feb
20
comment Why “programmer” is defined as designers and “developer” as creator?
@Geerten I think he's saying that to him, the definitions are switched... each term should have the definition of the other term.
Feb
20
comment Legal ramifications of use of the JavaScript trademark?
Right, that's the kind of thing I'm worried about. I'd assume using the iPhone trademark would be enough grounds for them to say I had implied that they had endorsed it. Realistically I doubt there would be a problem with "Foo JavaScript Library" since Oracle hasn't gone after anyone yet and there are way bigger fish to fry, but you never know... remember Mike Rowe Soft?
Feb
20
comment Legal ramifications of use of the JavaScript trademark?
'Anyone may use them, but only for "nominative" purposes' -- so I could make something called for example "The iPhone Doohickey" that somehow integrates with iPhones and not be infringing on Apple's trademark?
Feb
20
asked Legal ramifications of use of the JavaScript trademark?
Jan
15
comment What is a good IDE for client side JavaScript development?
@Raynos I don't think this is a symptom of that, I normally use a simple text editor. I use eclipse for PHP if I want to use the debugger or need to do refactoring that is complex enough that I'm worried I'll screw it up with sed. It certainly doesn't make my life miserable, and has nice autocompletion, popup help for user defined and built-in functions, debugger, etc. same for PHP as it does for Java. Zend's own PHP IDE is based on eclipse itself, in fact. Making eclipse seem like some kind of second-rate tool for PHP implies that the author of that article is clueless.
Jan
14
comment What is a good IDE for client side JavaScript development?
I don't really agree with that article either. Eclipse is perfectly fine for PHP; the visual debugger works great (you have to know how to set it up, though, and install the zend debugger). It's not that great for javascript for reasons others mentioned, but it still brings much more to the table than a simple text editor, and there's no reason its javascript support necessarily has to suck. If it had some way of "extern"ing things it would be fine. I need to try netbeans for js and see if it does a better job...
Jan
13
comment Trimming script size by using array notation for frequently accessed properties
That's a good point. This whole question might be overly subjective now that I think about it. Is reduction to 6/7 of the size significant? Is performance decrease of 41 mops to 37 mops significant? Is damage to readability significant? How do you balance the tradeoff between the three? Maybe there is no clear answer. :(