597 reputation
414
bio website stackoverflow.com
location Brighton, United Kingdom
age 56
visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen Dec 16 at 7:09

Optimisation, performance, algorithms, C, C++, Pascal, MATLAB, assembly, SIMD, SSE, AVX, NEON, AltiVec, Cell, GPGPU, CUDA, DSP, audio processing, image processing, communications, audio, control systems, embedded, real-time.


Aug
16
reviewed Reviewed Is it ok to write “extra” unit tests?
Aug
16
reviewed No Action Needed CAPTCHA blocking for my scraping script?
Dec
8
awarded  Scholar
Oct
11
comment How can I make sure that I'm actually learning how to program rather than simply learning the details of a language?
@Tobias: yes, it depends on what you mean by "learn" - personally I don't consider I've learnt something fully until I really have mastered it, but others may say they have learned something when all they really have mastered are the basics.
Oct
10
comment How can I make sure that I'm actually learning how to program rather than simply learning the details of a language?
Oh well, there goes that theory then...
Oct
10
comment How can I make sure that I'm actually learning how to program rather than simply learning the details of a language?
It takes ~10,000 hours to learn anything worth learning.
Oct
9
comment Clean readable code vs fast hard to read code. When to cross the line?
@Eugene: I usually keep the original version of a routine named foo and rename it foo_ref - typically it lives immediately above foo in the source file. In my test harness I call foo and foo_ref for validation and relative performance measurement.
Oct
5
comment Is there any reason zero should still equal false in a new programming language?
Well I'd say that there are a lot of reasons, some more significant than others, but it all boils down to common sense and efficiency. That was true when Boolean logic was first invented, when the first digital logic was implemented with relays and valves (tubes), and it's still true today, even though we've abstracted ourselves a long way from the underlying hardware.
Oct
5
comment Is there any reason zero should still equal false in a new programming language?
I disagree - in the early days of computing there was a much closer link between the programming model and the underlying hardware (there was virtually no distinction between the two originally). With such a long heritage, and its continued use today in logic design, and furthermore the fact that there is no obvious reason to change a convention that has always worked perfectly well, it is easy to see why we still use this convention today, at all conceptual levels.
Oct
5
comment Is there any reason zero should still equal false in a new programming language?
It goes deeper than assembly - digital logic (i.e. hardware) uses 0 and 1 for false and true - usually 0 is a low voltage (close to 0V) and 1 is a high voltage (close to Vcc, or whatever the supply voltage is). Logic design uses truth tables, Karnaugh maps and various other tools and even low level languages such as VHDL, all of which use the basic convention that 0 = false and 1 = true.
Oct
4
awarded  Yearling
Jun
13
reviewed Reviewed if i have many calls of single method that returns field value, is it better to make a local variable?
Feb
25
awarded  Caucus
Jan
4
awarded  Custodian
Jan
4
reviewed No Action Needed For PL/SQL, do large companies prefer ANSI SQL joins or old Oracle joins?
Nov
25
comment Where does the term “Front End” come from?
That's rather a silly comparison - "front end" as used in computing and electronics (and other engineering disciplines) has much the same meaning in each - there's nothing really special about its use in computing.
Nov
25
comment Where does the term “Front End” come from?
"Front end" has been used in electronics for a long time (e.g. RF receiver front ends) - this almost certainly predates its use in e.g. compiler terminology.
Oct
23
comment Assembly Language being used in Aircraft System
Either you misunderstood your lecturer or your lecturer is an idiot.
Oct
4
awarded  Yearling
Apr
25
awarded  Nice Answer