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visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen Sep 9 at 15:35

Jun
8
comment Does craftsmanship pay off?
@HedgeMage They are out there? Where? And how does one know before taking the job? (Probably 0 out of 3 of these questions are fair to ask...)
Apr
15
comment What background is needed to understand The Art of Computer Programming, Volume 4A?
@AdityaGameProgrammer I actually typed "knuth" when tagging the question, thinking for sure that had to be a tag. It wasn't, so I didn't add it.
Apr
15
comment What background is needed to understand The Art of Computer Programming, Volume 4A?
@FrustratedWithFormsDesigner The new edition does look quite elegant on the bookshelf just above my office desk, I think.
Mar
24
comment Turn away a bug if no reproducible test case exists?
@seansilver If a bug is more serious (as you say, causes the client to lose project information), that may make the bug higher on the priority list from a business perspective too, especially if the client is considered "very important" in terms of amount of business you get from them. You're right, from a developer perspective, bugs really are not acceptable, but because time and money are scarce, economics demands that choices be made and tasks be prioritized. This bug is always something you can come back to if you are having a slow day, for example.
Feb
2
comment How do I account for changed or forgotten tasks in an estimate?
@Job We're not a scrum shop at this time. Also, unlike what another answerer has suggested, I have found so far that the bottom-up estimates have improved my estimation accuracy, largely by vastly reducing the number of forgotten tasks during task-level estimation.
Feb
2
comment How do I account for changed or forgotten tasks in an estimate?
I could just wait until tomorrow and tell you this in person. :) I'm more concerned about history's inaccuracy if the extra tasks are not somehow included. Clearly, missing a task during task estimation is a "miss" regarding accuracy -- but which accuracy figure? The one I actually use in a quantitative sense is whether my actual task performance for each task was within the predicted range. The other, more qualitative, measure is how often I meet my 50%-confident single-point estimates. Too far over or under 50%, and I should adjust "expert judgment" for future 50% estimates.
Feb
2
comment How should I pronounce the :: and -> in PHP?
Double-colon is the same symbol as "cons" in ML, but since the meaning is totally different, I guess that doesn't work. Too bad, though, since it's a rather convenient name.
Feb
2
comment How do I account for changed or forgotten tasks in an estimate?
I think I'm going to need to give an example of how I am doing these calculations as well as the problem I'm trying to solve. I don't have time at the moment, but I'll get to it as soon as I can.
Feb
2
comment How do I account for changed or forgotten tasks in an estimate?
Yes, the missed tasks do get covered in the aggregate by the task-level ranges, which figure into the confidence levels I give out. I calculate those levels using a method McConnell proposes in Chapter 10 of Software Estimation, as I said before. I'm primarily wondering how I account for these missing or changed tasks in TFS hours reporting as well as how to include these hours when calculating my historical accuracy.
Feb
2
comment How do I account for changed or forgotten tasks in an estimate?
As to whether McConnell covers contingencies, my copy is also at work, so I'd have to check. I think what I am asking is how to account for missing/changed tasks when computing history data to inform the next estimate as well as where to assign the hours in TFS, since a contingency task is normally not allowed in our group.
Feb
2
comment How do I account for changed or forgotten tasks in an estimate?
Thank you for your answer. You raise interesting points. I already incorporate these three items in various ways in my estimates. Your first type, I have found, can typically be articulated and associated with one or more tasks. The second type just gets incorporated into my task-level range estimates: I'm not allowed to have an extra item for it (we've debated it, and for now, that's policy on our team). For the third, internal clients accept that changes will increase our estimate, and external clients have that in writing, so we're not supposed to consider changes.
Feb
1
comment How do I account for changed or forgotten tasks in an estimate?
Thanks for the answer. The method I've been using already allows me to do what you seem to be proposing, however, but it also takes into account (indirectly, by using a historical accuracy percentage) my past success with my estimates in order to generate the percent-confident estimates desired. What I am asking, though, is how to incorporate missed tasks into that historical accuracy when the accuracy is basically calculated by whether or not I finished a task within the range I used for my original estimate.
Feb
1
comment How do I account for changed or forgotten tasks in an estimate?
Thanks for the answer. The ranges I come up with do, as a whole, tend to allow me enough time to add forgotten tasks without missing the estimate for the whole project. My question speaks more to using this information in the calculation procedure I am using from the McConnell book.