296 reputation
16
bio website mikebabcock.ca/code
location Ontario, Canada
age 37
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Dec 7 at 4:01

Programmer, etc.


Feb
3
comment Checking equality of a request parameter
You might want to look at stackoverflow.com/questions/7349883/…
Jan
3
comment At what point is version control needed?
There is no reason not to use version control. It does no harm even when it adds no benefits, so why not?
Oct
13
comment Is fewer lines of code always better?
Neither example is easy to read. Something "real" would be nice. Consider pastebin.com/BbttaD4R
Oct
13
comment Is fewer lines of code always better?
This was my first thought as well -- the biggest problem with both examples is the useless function and variable names, not the layout of the code.
Jan
24
awarded  Yearling
Dec
21
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Dec
21
comment How to efficiently store IP addresses?
Not to mention that all the netmask arithmetic becomes much easier to do on one big value anyway.
Dec
21
answered Teaching Classes and Objects
Dec
21
comment Have I understood OOP correctly?
The design and layout of your objects to some degree depends on the language you choose to use. Some languages support different things better than others, so what to recommend is partly based on that.
Dec
19
comment Should UTF-16 be considered harmful?
For those reading this comment, its worth noting that UCS-2 is not the same thing as UTF-16. Please look up the differences to understand.
Nov
6
comment Why are source control systems still mostly backed with files?
I beg to differ. siteground.com/tutorials/git/directory.htm is a good start.
Nov
6
awarded  Commentator
Nov
6
comment Why are source control systems still mostly backed with files?
@Andy text editors are a beauty of Git -- cat .git/logs/refs/heads/master is simple and easy. Most other functionality is easily achieved this way as well. Remember that modern distributed version control is not server-based but hosted on every single box doing development. Even that's unfair: many are being used by authors and artists as well.
Nov
6
comment Why are source control systems still mostly backed with files?
@Andy using a filesystem isn't rolling your own database any more than creating tables within an RDBMS is. You have to create a data structure somewhere, and if that data structure is tree-based, the file system fits better than a typical RDBMS anyway. Point being: a relational database structure needs creating just as much as the file system structure, there's no 'savings' in effort either way.
Nov
6
comment Why are source control systems still mostly backed with files?
Just as a devil's advocate comment perhaps, most people who ask these types of "why not use a database" questions appear to mean "why not use an RDBMS?" with all the ACID compliance and other issues involved. The fact that all file systems are already databases of their own ilk having already been discarded.
Nov
4
comment Why are source control systems still mostly backed with files?
And yet, for argument's sake @EdwardThomson I'd never assume that a SQL transaction is done properly either. I've seen a great many bits of database code that are not in fact any more transaction safe than whimsy.
Nov
3
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
3
comment Why are source control systems still mostly backed with files?
@Andy its not hard to do things in a fs like diff > newdiff.tmp && mv old.diff old-date.diff && mv newdiff.tmp old.diff and avoid corruption issues most of the time anyway.
Nov
3
comment Why are source control systems still mostly backed with files?
To continue what @delnan said, git was designed by someone who wanted really high quality revision control for a very large code base and actually uses such a product every day. That its fast and functional the way it is is a function of that need.
Nov
3
answered Why are source control systems still mostly backed with files?