232 reputation
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location Germany
age 29
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
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Apr
4
comment How can one guarantee unique identifiers, even in the case of system collapse and restoration from backup
Nice idea. I can even save a timestamp every time I access the IDs, and if I suddenly find a timestamp which is older, I know that a backup has been restored. The only problem is, that if it's used on a workstation which was never turned on since the backup, it will not be automatically detected. (I wrote a similar case in the question, in "incrementing the ID"). If I cannot fully automate it, it still needs an actively enforced company policy, but I guess there is no other way.
Apr
4
comment How can one guarantee unique identifiers, even in the case of system collapse and restoration from backup
@drxzcl A good idea, actually I though of a USB hardware key, but over decades it can get lost or can malfunction.
Apr
4
revised How can one guarantee unique identifiers, even in the case of system collapse and restoration from backup
added 157 characters in body
Apr
4
asked How can one guarantee unique identifiers, even in the case of system collapse and restoration from backup
Mar
31
comment Why is CPU cache memory so fast?
@CharlesE.Grant : while the cost hierarchy is a good example, there is another reason we don't have 120 GB of on-chip cache: addressing larger memory needs larger addresses, so either larger instructions or more CPU cycles. So to be the fastest, the number of registers needs to remain relatively small. Of course, one could have on-chip memory besides the registers, but the fastest tier has to remain small, otherwise it would not be that fast anymore.
Oct
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
31
awarded  Yearling
Jul
25
answered Why do old C-style method names continue being used in modern languages?
Jan
18
comment My boss has a bad case of “Not Invented Here”
We should not use the ++ operator in C. What if they remove this feature in the next version? We should only use i=i+1; instead!
Nov
1
answered Are flag variables an absolute evil?
Oct
23
comment “Never do in code what you can get the SQL server to do well for you” - Is this a recipe for a bad design?
Starting a phrase with "never" or "always" is almost always a recipe for a bad design.
Oct
18
comment How to prevent code from leaking outside work?
Saying that you don't read other answers is just a magnet for downvotes.
Sep
26
answered Does a mature agile team requires any management?
Sep
25
answered Why are exceptions considered better than explicit error testing?
Sep
5
awarded  Critic
Aug
18
awarded  Commentator
Aug
18
comment Should I take care of race conditions which almost certainly has no chance of occuring?
It really depends what the chances are, and what the costs and benefits are. If the chance is smaller than the chance of the atoms in the computer rearranging themselves into a bowl of petunia, don't bother. (Actually, I assume the chances of a bit flip because of cosmic rays, or that an aircraft falls on it, or that a lightning hits it, are waaaay bigger than the chance you listed). Remember: unless you work for NASA, the client wants 99.9% working code now, instead of 100% working code 5 years later at ten times the cost.
Jun
30
revised My boss decided to add a “person to blame” field to every bug report. How can I convince him that it's a bad idea?
edited body
Jun
30
comment My boss decided to add a “person to blame” field to every bug report. How can I convince him that it's a bad idea?
I am Spartacus!
Jun
29
awarded  Teacher