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Jan
26
revised Is a TCP client/server a good solution for a system which can be controlled by a GUI running on multiple platforms?
added 75 characters in body
Jan
26
comment Is a TCP client/server a good solution for a system which can be controlled by a GUI running on multiple platforms?
The scope of the project is around 2 years for a small, 2-3 person team. I didn't want to make the question too localized.
Jan
26
revised Is a TCP client/server a good solution for a system which can be controlled by a GUI running on multiple platforms?
added 24 characters in body
Jan
26
comment Is a TCP client/server a good solution for a system which can be controlled by a GUI running on multiple platforms?
The TCP (or maybe even HTTP) will be there, no matter what. The question is whether it makes sense to split the main software into two parts which also communicate over TCP or not to split it.
Jan
26
asked Is a TCP client/server a good solution for a system which can be controlled by a GUI running on multiple platforms?
Jan
26
awarded  Informed
Jan
26
comment Should we avoid language features that C++ has but Java doesn't to increase maintainability?
This very same line of thinking leads to many people writing in C++ a code which is basically C with a few classes added to it. Or sometimes, just C code with the std namespace added to it.
Oct
2
awarded  Yearling
Oct
2
awarded  Good Answer
Oct
1
awarded  Mortarboard
Oct
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
1
awarded  Yearling
Oct
1
answered Should I stop using the term C/C++?
Sep
23
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
23
accepted What are the benefits of dependency injection in cases where almost everyone needs access to a common data structure?
Sep
23
comment What are the benefits of dependency injection in cases where almost everyone needs access to a common data structure?
I didn't say everyone, I said almost everyone. The point of the question was whether DI has other benefits besides denying access from those few actors who don't need it. I know that "god objects" are an anti-pattern, but blindly following best practices can also be one. It can happen that the entire purpose of a program is to do various things with a certain resource, in that case almost everyone needs access to that resource. A good example would be a program which works on an image: almost everything in it has something to do with the image data.
Sep
22
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
22
awarded  Nice Question
Sep
22
comment What are the benefits of dependency injection in cases where almost everyone needs access to a common data structure?
"This is a design nightmare" - I know it is. But if the requirements are that all those events must be able to perform the changes in the data, then the events will be coupled to the data even if I split and hide them under a layer of abstractions. The whole program is about this data. For example, if a program has to perform a lot of different operations on an image, than all or almost all of its classes will somehow be coupled to the image data. Just saying "let's write a program which does something different" is not acceptable.
Sep
22
comment What are the benefits of dependency injection in cases where almost everyone needs access to a common data structure?
sorry for the confusion with "non-mutable", I wanted to say mutable, and somehow didn't recognize my mistake.