1,767 reputation
812
bio website cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela
location Finland
age 62
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Sep 7 at 19:01

I’m an author and a consultant who specializes in character codes, localization, web authoring, accessibility, and typography. Author of Unicode Explained and Going Global with JavaScript and Globalize.js.


Jan
17
comment Will it be a wrong idea to have <style> in <body>?
@Galaxy, it does not answer the question, and if you expect the style element apply inside the div only, you are mistaken. If you want certain styling to be applied only in some states of a single-page application, you need to do that with suitable CSS selectors and/or scripting. (Especially since the scoped attribute does not work across browsers.)
Jan
17
comment Will it be a wrong idea to have <style> in <body>?
@Galaxy, I don’t see why a single-page application would lack a head element. An HTML page always has one.
Jan
16
comment Will it be a wrong idea to have <style> in <body>?
@patricksweeney, I think it’s somewhat theoretical in this context, but a correct observation; answer updated.
Jan
16
awarded  Editor
Jan
16
revised Will it be a wrong idea to have <style> in <body>?
added 160 characters in body
Jan
16
answered Will it be a wrong idea to have <style> in <body>?
Nov
25
comment Consequences of “naïve” vs “naive”?
The question is very broad and vague. It is not clear how “IE autocorrect” (whatever it means) relates to the issue, which seems to be generally about alternate spellings of words – an “autocorrect” may replace one spelling by another, but mostly the variation is in original data.
Oct
17
comment Is it a problem to have different styles of HTML coding within team?
@ErikReppen, your comment looks like your answer rather than a comment on mine. Anyway, it is not consistent: you cannot be minimal and stylistically consistent at the same time. The attribute class=foo is minimal, but not consistent with class="foo bar" (or class='foo bar'), where the quotation marks are required.
Oct
10
comment Can I use a @font-face of “Courier New”?
This is not a discussion forum but a Q/A site. You can enhance your own answer if you think your have additional arguments to support it. But you seem to have confused Courier with Courier New, to begin with.
Oct
10
comment Can I use a @font-face of “Courier New”?
Whatever the US legislation and its interpretation might be, using a downloadable font on the Web means using it worldwide, so the laws of all countries apply. And in most countries, all creative works, including fonts, are automatically protected by copyright.
Oct
10
answered Can I use a @font-face of “Courier New”?
Oct
10
awarded  Commentator
Oct
10
comment Can I use a @font-face of “Courier New”?
Wikipedia is here, as so often, unreliable or even bogus. Copyright applies automatically.
Oct
2
comment How to cross-reference many character encodings with ASCII OR UTFx?
What is the question? There is a vague description of “concepts” related to “customized auto-detection of character encoding”, but no real problem description. You cannot really expect to design such auto-detection without a solid understanding of character encodings and their great variation (including the fact that not all encodings use a single byte per character, as the question seems to imply).
Aug
7
answered Why is a tooltip's attribute labelled 'title='?
Aug
7
comment Why is a tooltip's attribute labelled 'title='?
There is no documented connection between the title element and the title attribute, beyond the name. Regarding the reference in the comment, there was never any HTML 1.2 specification. The linked document is an Internet-draft that expired long ago.
Aug
7
comment Why is a tooltip's attribute labelled 'title='?
@KRyan, speech-based browsers may inform the user about the availability of extra information when they encounter a title attribute and read its value on user request.
Aug
1
answered Am I required to memorize coding in a work space or can I fall onto references to provide me edge to finishing my development?
Jun
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
8
comment Why was strict parsing not chosen for HTML?
IE has actually lost quite a lot of its market share. But this probably has little if anything to do with strict parsing. IE, with its oddities, ruled the web long enough to force other browsers largely imitate its oddities, because so many pages would otherwise fall apart.