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Jan
27
reviewed No Action Needed How do I minimize the number of database queries in a GeoJson API (of countries, and smaller areas) with custom data?
Jan
27
awarded  Custodian
Jan
27
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jan
27
comment I think fan-in fan-out is backward, please explain
@nocomprende I suppose I can say I'd never heard "fan-in" or "fan-out" used for types of graphs other than electrical circuits either. I work with call and data-flow graphs on a daily basis, but we're not working on metrics of coupling in software systems, so the size of the set of in/out edges isn't particularly interesting to us. But I see how someone working on that problem would be tempted to broaden the terms "fan-in" and "fan-out" as generic directed-graph terms for the counts of in/out edges, as they are, in a certain sense, counts of directed edges in a graph of an electrical system.
Jan
27
comment I think fan-in fan-out is backward, please explain
@nocomprende Functions do receive inputs from their callers...but they aren't electrical diagrams or Simulink models, where data flows are the feature that's visibly exposed. Structured programming is about delegating responsibility for performing arbitrary tasks; it's the steps required to perform a task that the code expresses. In object-oriented programming, the data is intended to be encapsulated: protected from manipulation, and hidden from the consumers of services provided using that data, so the data can change more easily, as long as it supports the required services.
Jan
25
comment I think fan-in fan-out is backward, please explain
@nocomprende I'm not an expert in electronics by any means, but my feeling is that in the world of digital electronics, the meaningful direction is defined by causality, rather than the actual movement direction of electrons, etc. Wouldn't fan in be the set of traces from which the incoming signal comes, regardless of which direction the electrons are actually flowing? Wouldn't the fan out be the set of outgoing traces that carry the signal that is propagated after our component's latency, regardless of what type of flow is propagating the signal?
Jan
22
revised I think fan-in fan-out is backward, please explain
deleted 56 characters in body
Jan
22
answered I think fan-in fan-out is backward, please explain
Oct
26
comment When is it not appropriate to use the dependency injection pattern?
@RichardTingle The major upside of that approach is that you're very independent of your data source. The major downside is that when you receive the wrong data, you have to figure out where the data came from.
Oct
26
comment When is it not appropriate to use the dependency injection pattern?
@RichardTingle Sure, it's usually desirable to construct your dependencies yourself, which is part of what my answer is saying. I think the benefit usually comes when you wish your code didn't have to know how to retrieve some piece of data, e.g. with Guice, to produce a greeting you can write @Provides @Greeting public static void String helloDI(@Inject @Name toGreet) { return "Hello " + toGreet + "!";}, as long as at least one function (whose dependencies are available) @Provides @Name.
Oct
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
11
awarded  Yearling
May
29
awarded  Informed
Feb
10
awarded  Yearling
Mar
23
comment How to create a Web app that “interacts” with email?
Do remember that anyone can spoof the from field, so you shouldn't design a system this way if there's any potential for benefit by third parties, or potential for serious harassment to your clients. If there is, you probably need something more secure than email.
Feb
11
awarded  Yearling
Dec
17
awarded  Quorum
Dec
15
revised Why is multithreading often preferred for improving performance?
grammar
Dec
15
revised Why is multithreading often preferred for improving performance?
Another spot I missed finishing