8,630 reputation
13150
bio website oleksiderkatch.blogspot.com
location Waterloo, Canada
age 24
visits member for 2 years, 2 months
seen Apr 10 at 3:14

Aspiring software engineer for the healthcare industry. Currently studying Computer Science at The University Of Waterloo.

profile for Oleksi on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites


May
30
comment User defined type for healthcare / Medical Records variable name prefixes?
@Ryathal abbrevations are only ok when most people can deduce what the full word is supposed to be. If an abbreviation is too terse (or worse yet, in Latin) you risk other developers not knowing the meaning of your identifiers.
May
30
answered User defined type for healthcare / Medical Records variable name prefixes?
May
29
awarded  Guru
May
29
awarded  Enlightened
May
29
answered In need of a divide and conquer approach for re-writing small open-source utilities
May
29
comment Stuck due to “knowing too much”
@MSalters It's tricky, which is one of the reasons I didn't recommend this in my answer. However if you wanted to choose this route, I would partition the input space into several disjoint and complete classes: (Cache miss, cache hit), (Cache empty, cache non-empty), etc. This shouldn't generate a lot of tests. Once this is in place, then write your code to pass those basic tests. Next, I would use some code coverage tool to see what parts of the code aren't covered by the current test set, and add tests as required.
May
29
awarded  Good Answer
May
29
awarded  Nice Answer
May
28
comment Stuck due to “knowing too much”
@MSalters I think Graham is referring to TDD, where you write a set of tests before the code. Then you write the simplest code that makes those tests pass. Then you refactor. Following this technique may prevent you from over-thinking your initial development since your goal is to make the test pass, not make perfect code.
May
28
revised Stuck due to “knowing too much”
added 9 characters in body
May
28
answered Stuck due to “knowing too much”
May
28
comment Why C++ to write a compiler?
@delnan There's probably plenty more that I could've done to make it readable. I guess I'll know for next time. :)
May
27
comment Why C++ to write a compiler?
All that I meant to imply was that it felt more natural to do something like pushing out machine instruction bytes (which felt like a low-level operation) in a low-level language. When I did it with Scheme it felt awkward. Because manipulating bytes and pushing them out is a lot more common in C, than Scheme, there were better libraries available that made the code much cleaner. Perhaps the code might not have been as awkward in other high-level, or perhaps that I just didn't know Scheme well at the time.
May
26
comment What are some ways to maintain codebases written in two languages that implement the same logic?
Just make absolutely sure that you need that performance. Maintaining two versions of a program (especially one this complex), is a colossale effort. Make sure you absolutely need to do this in C++, because your are going to pay a huge cost in time and effort to do this in two languages.
May
26
comment What are some ways to maintain codebases written in two languages that implement the same logic?
Do you really have to re implement it in another language? Why not use just Java?
May
26
awarded  Nice Answer
May
26
comment Why C++ to write a compiler?
@Giorgio I did it as part of my degree. It's good fun. :)
May
26
comment Why C++ to write a compiler?
@Giorgio Really, you can write a compiler with mostly OOP or mostly Functional concepts, but the best solution would probably to use the best of both worlds. I wrote a toy compiler for a C-like language in Scheme once, and I wished that it had some Object Oriented features. Scheme handled some things very naturally (parsing and lexing comes to mind), but with others (specifically code generation and optimization), I found Scheme a little awkward. I though that some object oriented concepts would have really helped.
May
26
comment Why C++ to write a compiler?
@Giorgio Having objects helps in a lot of other aspects of compiler writing. For example, there's a lot of state a compiler has to deal with when optimizing and that kind of stuff lends itself well to OOP. Also, OOP and Functional programming can be quite complimentary, so just because the algorithms might be mostly functional, doesn't mean that objects won't help.
May
26
answered Why C++ to write a compiler?