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location Seattle, WA
age 57
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen 4 hours ago

Mar
30
comment Why does every installer on Windows have to be run with elevated privileges?
@GrandMasterB, good point. I've gone far afield from the original question and your comment.
Mar
30
comment Why does every installer on Windows have to be run with elevated privileges?
@GrandmasterB, but look at other OS that don't use a central registry, OS X and Linux for example. It may seem annoying to have a thousand little configuration files scattered over your file system, but you avoid the single point of failure, so at least the fan club app won't kill the database.
Mar
30
comment Why does every installer on Windows have to be run with elevated privileges?
The trouble is that far too many Windows programmers use elevated privileges entirely gratuitously. The put icons on the shared desktop when they could just put them on the user's desktop. They write settings in HKLM when there is no reason they couldn't go in HKCU. They could put the executables in the user's directory tree, but they insist on putting them in the system directories. Even worse they hard code stuff to "C:\Program Files" even though there has been an API to find where programs should be installed since Winodws 3.1. As far as I can tell it's all just laziness.
Mar
30
comment Why does every installer on Windows have to be run with elevated privileges?
@GrandmasterB, the tragedy of the registry is that Microsoft has provided a nuanced and sophisticated infrastructure, but far too many programers use it as a garbage can. Need a persistent setting? Bang, into HKLM it goes, far too much trouble to look in HKCU. It also creates a bizarre coupling between all your applications: the install of your Justin Bieber fan club app corrupts the registry, and the next thing you know, your SQL Server won't boot.
Mar
28
comment Does anyone work in / know much about programming jobs for scientific / medical research?
BioTech companies certainly hire web programmers to fill the same needs as at other companies: human resources, payroll, client communications, marketing, etc. If you want to get in at the more 'sciency' end of things, I think it's tricky. I've never worked in BigPharama or medical engineering, but from my own job searches I have the impression that you simply MUST have experience in the field, and with the regulatory frameworks before they'll even look at you. I have no idea how people break into the field for their first job.
Mar
28
answered Does anyone work in / know much about programming jobs for scientific / medical research?
Mar
26
answered Do software engineers really need to know low level stuff anymore?
Mar
25
comment Time to drop Emacs and vi?
@Ed S., how long do you plan to be a programmer? I learned VI 30 years ago. Believe me it's paid off (though of course these days I use VIM).
Mar
17
comment Why does a computer science degree matter to a professional programmer?
@qes, who said anything about college being the only way to get CS concepts? The original question was from someone who had a CS degree and wondering why it wasn't of more use in his job. You commented that you don't use some of those concepts in your job, with the implication that they are therefore useless. That is a false deduction. It may be true for your job, but your job is not the template for all programming jobs.
Mar
17
comment Why does a computer science degree matter to a professional programmer?
@qes, @P. Brian Mackey, not all programming jobs are alike. Most programming jobs don't need or use the material learned in a CS degree, which is part of why there are so many successful self-taught programmers. If you want to work on problems that will use more of your CS education you are going to have to actively seek out the companies that do that sort of work. Google, Microsoft, Amazon, Oracle, and IBM obviously fall in that category, but there are many small shops out there too.
Mar
9
revised Not getting paid for hours you've worked?
added 189 characters in body; deleted 47 characters in body
Mar
9
answered Not getting paid for hours you've worked?
Mar
7
answered “Half of everything you know will be obsolete in 18-24 months” = ( True, or False? )
Mar
1
answered Using template questions in a technical interview
Feb
27
awarded  Good Answer
Feb
25
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
25
comment Why do programmers use or recommend Mac OS X?
@Codingbear as I said, I do keep a current Windows machine, so I had Vista and now have Windows 7. Windows 7 does have a nice collection of desktop themes, but I haven't found any features that are personally compelling. I was more impressed by the transition from XP to Vista. I thought it really improved the security model, and I thought Powershell looked interesting. At the same time I was discouraged because Vista made it clear how sloppy a lot of app writers were about gratuitously using Admin privileges.
Feb
25
answered Why do programmers use or recommend Mac OS X?
Feb
25
awarded  Enlightened
Feb
24
awarded  Good Answer