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visits member for 4 years, 2 months
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Jul
14
answered Why is Perl so heavily used in Bioinformatics?
Jul
14
awarded  Good Answer
Jul
10
comment Understand scripting language
@Thomas Owens, really? I mean I'm sure there are IEEE publications that offer a definition of a scripting language, but that's not the same thing as a promulgated standard. In any event, they may have offered that definition as a standard, but it doesn't fit common usage. Sed and Awk are inevitably referred to as scripting languages, but they certainly weren't designed to connect two or more applications, except insofar as any two applications reading from stdin and writing to stdout can be pipelined, but then that would make 'C' a scripting language.
Jul
9
answered Understand scripting language
Jul
4
answered Is learning technology by reading books obsolete?
Jul
4
comment What is the difference between a great programmer and a financially successful programmer?
Tables, "They didn't necessarily produce THAT much that was all that technically difficult or magical from a programming perspective." In the case of Facebook, Twitter, or Hotmail, I'd certainly agree with you. But Page and Brin's PageRank algorithm was a significant piece of pure CS research. Another example would be Rivest, Shamir and Adleman and the RSA public key encryption algorithm. Those guys still needed the business savvy (and luck), but at the core of their success was a significant technical invention.
Jul
1
comment Does over-reliance on tools imply that you are lazy?
+1 pointing out that it's a matter of perspective. I was around when UNIX first came out of Bell Labs and there was a considerable amount of 'tsk tsk'ing that high level languages like 'C' were dumbing down the ancient and esoteric art of writing operating systems, and this surely would lead to no good. As our tools get better and take care of more mindless bookkeeping for us we can use the time saved to tackle harder, and more subtle problems.
Jun
30
comment Do software developers know what engineers actually do?
I think the point of the question is that there is opinion and then there is informed opinion. For example, do you have actual experience in engineering large structures or enterprise applications? If not, why should your opinion on the matter carry any weight? Lord knows I find myself opining on things I have minimal or no expertise on, but it's a bad habit.
Jun
18
comment How does a CLI-oriented programmer's workflow differ from a GUI-oriented one?
Isn't this a duplicate of your previous question: programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/82519/… ?
Jun
16
revised Advice for an ambitious student on building your own kernel
deleted 5 characters in body
Jun
16
answered Advice for an ambitious student on building your own kernel
Jun
9
answered Why SQL numeric precision is specified as the number of digits?
Jun
8
comment How did programmers use networking to share expensive computer resources in the 60's and 70's?
@Alex, You may laugh, but they were fairly common into the early 80s. Here is a link to a manual for one: ukcc.uky.edu/ukccinfo/391/rug.html. They were quite a convenience if you were in the physics department, and the computer center was across the campus. There was usually a remote line printer too. More specialized output would be delivered the next day in the inter-campus mail.
Jun
5
comment How do I deal with the need to know multiple programming languages?
-1 for being more of a rant than an answer, and for confusing your personal experience with the world. I'd like to see what "research" you are referring to. The pop notion going around these days is that it takes 10,000 hours of active practice to develop expertise in an field. This was popularized by the writings of Malcom Gladwell. It is probably not bad as a rule of thumb, but it's hardly a law of physics. 10,000 hours is five years of 40 hour weeks, and of course many of us put in much longer hours the early stages of our careers.
May
28
answered What appears in your mind if someone asks for a module for application?
May
27
awarded  Good Answer
May
25
comment Is it worth making Visual Assembly?
Actually if you just want to edit/debug MASM in Visual Studio, you can already to that. See kipirvine.com/asm/gettingStartedVS2010/index.htm
May
25
comment Is it worth making Visual Assembly?
The question is ambiguous. What do you mean by Visual Assembler? Would it just let you write Microsoft MASM code in the Visual Studio environment for translation into native code? Or would it let you hand code ILM for translation into byte code. Either one might have its uses.
May
24
comment The definition of C-based language
@pst, a fair point, but there are different ways to slice and dice the family tree of languages. I'd argue that Algol, C, C++, C#, Java, Simula, and Smalltalk are all imperative, so if you want to distinguish among them you have to break it down further by procedural vs OO, and as Mason Wheeler points out, Simula OO vs Smalltalk (message passing) OO.
May
24
comment The definition of C-based language
@Mason, you're right. I've corrected my answer.