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Sep
18
comment Why are many programmers moving their code to github?
@KonradRudolph I think the reason people are avoiding SourceForge now not only because of their website, but also because of their sometime overly strict project approval. I submitted a project for a small hobby OS and got rejected... At the time, Github was still new and experimental, so I went with google code. Personally, I think all of the traditional sites are beat out by Bitbucket's user interface and options. Personally, I like Bitbucket's site more than Github even
Sep
18
comment A good interpreted language for a small embedded project
@JimmyHoffa you're saying I should implement scheme on my device and then from there implement a scripting language in scheme? double interpretation? lol
Sep
18
comment A good interpreted language for a small embedded project
There is eLua but it's out of my range for resources. Basically 32K of RAM is required for anything useful
Sep
18
asked A good interpreted language for a small embedded project
Sep
15
asked Best thing to do about projects supporting multiple versions of Visual Studio?
Sep
14
comment Starting off with web dev with php
+1 for PHP is bad. I agree with all of your reasons except for "cannot self host". PHP, I'd argue is the easiest thing to self-host... although configuring it to actually work with your applications is another thing.
Sep
12
comment Why are many programmers moving their code to github?
@Den Yea, I really don't know why BitBucket isn't more popular. It has private hosting and let's you choose between Git or Mercurial (which I like Mercurial a lot more)
Sep
9
awarded  Yearling
Sep
7
answered How can I convince my boss that ANSI C is inadequate for our new project?
Jul
28
answered Pros and Cons of holding all the business logic in stored procedures in web application
Jul
26
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
5
accepted Which algorithms/data structures should I “recognize” and know by name?
Jul
5
comment Which algorithms/data structures should I “recognize” and know by name?
@JamesYoungman good point there, but that wasn't included as part of the problem. I asked the same thing to the interviewer and he said assume it's a flat fee
Jul
5
comment Which algorithms/data structures should I “recognize” and know by name?
Also, I have a lot of studying to do :)
Jul
5
comment Which algorithms/data structures should I “recognize” and know by name?
Good point about the locker problem. The only thing is that wouldn't a queue still be faster if random access wasn't required? (A customer says "I need a locker" not "I need locker #123") I'm unsure of what you'd say the complexity is for adding and removing from a queue. Probably O(n)?
Jul
5
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
4
comment Which algorithms/data structures should I “recognize” and know by name?
@Telastyn Random access isn't needed though. A person will get a locker out of the free list, and a person will return a locker to the free list. That's it. If you want to discuss further we can carry this onto chat
Jul
4
comment Which algorithms/data structures should I “recognize” and know by name?
@Telastyn So you're suggesting an array? How will you remove a locker from the free list or add one back. This was an Amazon interview question and I thought an array at first as well and we ended up at queue/stack as being the most efficient. Of course, a linked-list could be used too, but I think all three will perform the same
Jul
4
comment Which algorithms/data structures should I “recognize” and know by name?
@Oded How exactly should I rephrase it to not be subjective?
Jul
4
asked Which algorithms/data structures should I “recognize” and know by name?