6,143 reputation
31844
bio website earlz.net
location Cleveland, OH
age 23
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Apr 11 at 14:17

Hello there! My name's Jordan Earls and I'm a programmer. Recently, I've been doing almost exclusively work in .Net with C#, a bit of raw IL, and in some cases a hefty serving of code generating T4(it's the meta-future!). Sometimes I do a bit of embedded/electronic work with C and C++(http://mbed.org rocks, btw). And finally, I have at least some competence in Ruby, Delphi, and Javascript.

I currently work for PreEmptive Solutions on the Dotfuscator team and troll the dotfuscator tag on occasion.

Most of my personal projects are open source and BSD licensed. The majority of them are at bitbucket with the rest of them being listed on github

Also, you can follow me on the twitters @earlzdotnet


Feb
16
comment Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
@DanielB I can understand that viewpoint. Just seems like something that is really awesome to give a demo and say "this is how easy it is to get started".. but then when you need to refactor it's another story
Feb
15
comment What is a practical level of abstraction in a web application?
A bit off-topic, but can you elaborate on why the PHP team rejected annotations?
Feb
15
comment Which license for an open source project which may be, but is not intended to be, used as a bot in some apps?
...or release it anonymously in a pastebin or some such to avoid trouble like that
Feb
15
comment Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
@DanielB it's possible, albeit not as trivial. For example my POC type-safe fluent API for routing gist.github.com/Earlz/4951054
Feb
15
comment Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
@ArnisL. I'm not saying it is. I am saying I prefer static to dynamic though.
Feb
15
accepted Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
Feb
14
comment Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
Good point about static reflection. I forgot about that being introduced in 3.5
Feb
14
comment Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
I would tend to agree, except for it really isn't. What really made XAML click for me is that it isn't just a markup language. It's a way of describing an object graph. Although I see your point for avoiding verbosity.
Feb
14
comment Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
And I don't quite understand ".Net did not support static transversal of the object graph until the 3.5 release". Can you elaborate on what was missing? Generics arrived in 2.0
Feb
14
comment Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
As far as XAML goes, you'd think they would've took the chance to improve it in WinRT since it's basically a complete rewrite anyway(which isn't API compatible). or everything else. What do you mean "routes are dynamic" though? I know you can't replace the URL pattern with some object graph, but what about the other parts? And as far as Entity Framework/Linq, I've experienced this. Very awesome being able to change your database and suddenly get compiler errors for the incompatibilities.
Feb
14
comment Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
Care to elaborate?
Feb
14
awarded  Nice Question
Feb
14
comment Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
@delnan well, the compiler does, but all that compile-time checking is negated when you pass it somewhere as an object and treat it's property/method names as strings
Feb
14
comment Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
@delnan I've been implementing my own MVC framework that is statically typed through and through and it's really NOT that inconvienent though. I'd think relying on so much reflection would make things harder to implement
Feb
14
comment Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
@GlenH7 In some cases it encourage anonymous objects... but those objects aren't really passed around everywhere in most cases so it doesn't matter much
Feb
14
comment Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
I can understand if you choose a dynamic language like Ruby, you can bet that types won't be deterministic and they'll be a lot of metaprogramming. The language was built for it and the framework will take advantage. However, for ASP.Net MVC for instance, it's designed to run on statically typed C#. Why must it use so much metaprogramming to actually work? You'd think a static framework for a static language just like every dynamic language usually has only dynamic frameworks
Feb
14
revised Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
only ask one thing. Why
Feb
14
asked Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
Feb
12
answered Should Junior Programmers be involved as code reviewers in the projects of Senior Programmers?
Feb
11
comment JVM vs operating systems
@K.Steff good point! I remembered hearing something about JVM accelerations but didn't think it mattered enough to mention