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Feb
15
comment Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
@DanielB it's possible, albeit not as trivial. For example my POC type-safe fluent API for routing gist.github.com/Earlz/4951054
Feb
15
comment Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
@ArnisL. I'm not saying it is. I am saying I prefer static to dynamic though.
Feb
15
accepted Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
Feb
14
comment Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
Good point about static reflection. I forgot about that being introduced in 3.5
Feb
14
comment Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
I would tend to agree, except for it really isn't. What really made XAML click for me is that it isn't just a markup language. It's a way of describing an object graph. Although I see your point for avoiding verbosity.
Feb
14
comment Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
And I don't quite understand ".Net did not support static transversal of the object graph until the 3.5 release". Can you elaborate on what was missing? Generics arrived in 2.0
Feb
14
comment Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
As far as XAML goes, you'd think they would've took the chance to improve it in WinRT since it's basically a complete rewrite anyway(which isn't API compatible). or everything else. What do you mean "routes are dynamic" though? I know you can't replace the URL pattern with some object graph, but what about the other parts? And as far as Entity Framework/Linq, I've experienced this. Very awesome being able to change your database and suddenly get compiler errors for the incompatibilities.
Feb
14
comment Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
Care to elaborate?
Feb
14
awarded  Nice Question
Feb
14
comment Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
@delnan well, the compiler does, but all that compile-time checking is negated when you pass it somewhere as an object and treat it's property/method names as strings
Feb
14
comment Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
@delnan I've been implementing my own MVC framework that is statically typed through and through and it's really NOT that inconvienent though. I'd think relying on so much reflection would make things harder to implement
Feb
14
comment Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
@GlenH7 In some cases it encourage anonymous objects... but those objects aren't really passed around everywhere in most cases so it doesn't matter much
Feb
14
comment Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
I can understand if you choose a dynamic language like Ruby, you can bet that types won't be deterministic and they'll be a lot of metaprogramming. The language was built for it and the framework will take advantage. However, for ASP.Net MVC for instance, it's designed to run on statically typed C#. Why must it use so much metaprogramming to actually work? You'd think a static framework for a static language just like every dynamic language usually has only dynamic frameworks
Feb
14
revised Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
only ask one thing. Why
Feb
14
asked Why does the .Net world seem to embrace magic strings instead of staticly typed alternatives?
Feb
12
answered Should Junior Programmers be involved as code reviewers in the projects of Senior Programmers?
Feb
11
comment JVM vs operating systems
@K.Steff good point! I remembered hearing something about JVM accelerations but didn't think it mattered enough to mention
Feb
11
answered JVM vs operating systems
Feb
8
comment Alternative to “Passing/Broken build” indicator?
@Matthieu I see what you're getting at. Sounds like you need a special category or something that says "hey, if this test is failing, it's ok. we know about it. But we still want it ran and if it passes then that's even better and we should remove the special category because we now care if it breaks"
Feb
7
awarded  Popular Question