579 reputation
27
bio website nls.net/mp/jarvis
location Akron, OH
age 57
visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen Nov 29 at 20:36

I yearn to be Bugs.

I suspect I am Daffy.

I look like Elmer.


Nov
25
comment Function guaranteed to never return the same value twice
@Snowman: WHAT?!? Your solution is only valid for 250K years?!?!? NEXT CANDIDATE!!!!!! :-)
Nov
21
comment What should an object be called that contains only setters and getters?
An object...with no functionality...is not an object. A donut...with no hole...is a danish...
Oct
8
comment Why should your code not use 100% CPU?
@BrianHooper - Mr. Pr sid nt! W must mov at onc to clos th Lett r Gap!
Sep
6
comment Do else blocks increase code complexity?
In my experience there is effectively NO difference in performance between the two and the version with the else is easier to read and understand. The compiler may well choose to rearrange the code into the non-else version under the covers, and that's fine. Our job as developers is to write the clearest, most-easily-understood code possible, which in this limited case means use the else, Luke!
Jul
29
comment Why was the first compiler written before the first interpreter?
@supercat - 1973 - but the computer in question (an EDP-18, by Educational Data Products) was relatively elderly even then. Still, it was what we had (and having any computer to mess with in high school in the early-mid-70s was unusual) so as we thought it was pretty amazing. :-)
Jul
29
comment Why was the first compiler written before the first interpreter?
Disk? Ummmm...no. Tape. Big, slow, reel-to-reel tapes. And lots of them. I remember going to a lecture given by Grace Murray Hopper (doubly interesting to me because I was a systems analysis major AND a midshipman in the Navy ROTC detachment on campus, and CAPT Hopper was a serving naval officer). She related a story where, she said, she came up with the idea of writing unused parts of a program to tape - she called it "using auxiliary storage". "But", she said, "the idea didn't catch on until IBM did the same thing and called it Virtual Memory". CAPT Hopper really disliked IBM... :-)
Jul
29
comment Why was the first compiler written before the first interpreter?
@supercat - yes, teletypes were used, but they were far from "interactive". The first computer I programmed had a memory consisting of 18 bit words - 1K of them. The memory itself was a rotating drum, so when you turned the computer on you had to wait until the memory came up to speed. It had a teletype attached and you could A) read a character typed in from either the keyboard or read by the paper tape reader (from the point of view of the computer both were the same), B) write a character to the "printer" of the teletype. Ah, great days - GREAT days..! IS MY GRUEL WARM YET?!?!? :-)
Jul
29
comment Why was the first compiler written before the first interpreter?
@JörgWMittag - Clarke's First Law - "When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong". (Although I don't think you could say that McCarthy was "elderly", being only about 32 at the time - but given that it was very early days and he'd been at it for over 10 years I suppose that he was pretty much the "old man" wherever he went, so... :-).
Jul
23
answered Can a closed-source programming language survive?
Jun
11
comment How to name a method that both performs a task and returns a boolean as a status?
Umm...BadlyDesignedMethodInSeriousNeedOfRefactoring? And to answer your question about the exceptions - I'd either let the caller handle them, or catch them and then throw a custom exception that means "this method no do its job". Share and enjoy.
Jan
17
comment Why do we still use floats?
Ah - so it's the fault of the HARDWARE! That's GREAT! It frees the developer from having to actually THINK so he can just sit in his cubicle and serve the whine! Feh! You want smooth and realistic, you do what it takes to get there! You want fast and accurate, you do what it takes to get there! Share and enjoy.
Nov
27
comment How do programmers quit a job?
When the company decides to let you go you get zero notice - more commonly it's "Uh, Fred, could you join us in (managers name)'s office for a minute?". That "minute" is your notice. When we had a pile of layoffs a while ago it was the typical bad scene - people being called into manager's offices one by one, then walked out the door by security with box in hand, with the entire department paralyzed by fear, etc, blah. Sonsabitches...
Oct
8
awarded  Yearling
May
31
awarded  Autobiographer
May
24
comment First dedicated IDE?
@JonStrayer - IDE does not imply graphics. Turbo Pascal, which I think most who used it would consider to have had an IDE, did it all in character mode on IBM PC's. Ditto and likewise SPF/ISPF on IBM mainframes where graphics were not commonly available on the desks of lowly programmers. Certainly OP's second and third things could be done on a TTY, albeit differently than on a character terminal, which would be different from what we get today. Times change, capabilities change, expectations change. And so it goes...
Apr
30
comment At what point during a project is it unreasonable to leave?
@MartinBeckett - leaving with no notice is "burning bridges" but, yes, it's the flip side of "at will". Employers can tell you to get out, now, and you can toss your badge on the desk and say "Adios!". Note that getting that last paycheck, etc, can get sticky if you bail without notice so plan your emotional crises in advance, please.
Nov
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
8
awarded  Yearling
Jun
4
comment Do I really need oop for my kind of job? After 10 years I think I don't
@Kyralessa: you might want to investigate Smalltalk.
Jun
1
comment How do you portray to non programmers what programming involves?
Management Rule #1: Everything is easy, as long as someone else is doing it. :-)