1,944 reputation
513
bio website apokalypsesoftware.com
location Crawfordville, FL
age 50
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen Aug 11 at 18:49

Seer. Founder/Pres, Apokalypse Software Corp., Publisher of Productivity Software.


May
21
comment I am making 4-5x more story points than average, but producing bugs at half the rate. Graphs say it's 2x more bugs, how to deal with that?
@GlenH7- Again, programmers have trouble with clear reasoning. A line of buggy code is several times more expensive than one which is bug-free. Managers grok this. Look at GM's defective ignition fiasco, and grok this. You cannot reasonably spew lines of code thinking testers and maintainers will clean it up afterwards. Just quit spewing out junk from the get-go.
May
18
comment I am making 4-5x more story points than average, but producing bugs at half the rate. Graphs say it's 2x more bugs, how to deal with that?
This answer, and the community's support of it, is a great example of the muddled thinking rampant in our industry, that software is terribly written because programmers have such difficulty with logic and clear reasoning. "If anything, higher productivity means you'll have more time at the end of the project to hunt those bugs down or the developer will be faster in finding the bugs they created." That's insane. "Let's first add all the features, and we'll debug afterwards. Then we'll show how fast we code, and how fast we debug, etc. It's much easier fixing bugs when they're all present!"
May
17
answered I am making 4-5x more story points than average, but producing bugs at half the rate. Graphs say it's 2x more bugs, how to deal with that?
Apr
7
comment How does fair use apply to code snippets?
Programmers are bad enough at their job that it is apparent to anyone else that you guys aren't qualified to expound on the law. Copying snippets of code from a program to put into another program is using it for the same purpose for which it was originally written, and doesn't fall under fair use. The snippets would need to be rewritten to be substantially different from the source to be legally protected from copyright liability. The fact that there is no specific numeric guideline means it is subjective, and a court may judge against its use. The only sure legal way is to redo the code.
Mar
13
awarded  Good Answer
Oct
30
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
11
awarded  Yearling
Jun
20
comment Are null references really a bad thing?
Both null references (with its catch-all characteristic) and exceptions (with its lose-all characteristic) are terrible craftsmanship. Your code will lack the level of detail necessary to help expose and isolate bugs, and provide the user alternatives when things fail.
Jun
6
comment Are null references really a bad thing?
@greenoldman, you continue to prove the point that primitive types are inadequate for modeling. First it was over negative numbers. Now it's over the division operator when zero is the divisor. If you know you can't divide by zero then you can predict the outcome isn't going to be pretty, and are responsible for ensuring you test for, and provide the appropriate "valid" value for that case. Software developers are responsible for knowing the parameters in which their code operates, and coding appropriately. It's what distinguishes engineering from tinkering.
Jun
6
comment Are null references really a bad thing?
@dash-tom-bang, creating your own type isn't helpful for semantically modeling data to match the domain? You're actually claiming that? Software developers are the only ones who can ensure the system performs according to needed tolerances. Adding a test to your class for the occasions in which the right side is greater than the left side, and determining the proper course of action on those occasions is precisely what you're supposed to do, and the domain-specific class is where you do it.
May
26
comment Are there any unions for software developers?
Of course the AMA and ABA are unions. Examine the functions of any union near you and you'll see how similar the AMA and ABA are in function to them. The fact those organizations also lobby doesn't diminish the rest of their functions; after all, unions also lobby the lawmakers. And though unions might bargain for members at a particular company, the AMA & ABA bargain for their members before lawmakers. Even employers lobby lawmakers. The only ones who don't lobby are software professionals because they don't want to have a union. How naive!
May
26
comment Are null references really a bad thing?
@greenoldman, your example is doubly effective to demonstrate our point in that the use of primitive types (whether null or integers) as semantic models is poor practice. If you have a type for which negative numbers isn't a valid answer, you should create a new class of types to implement the semantic model with that meaning. Now all the code to handle the modeling of that non-negative type is localized to its class, isolated from the rest of the system, and any attempt to create a negative value for it can be caught immediately.
May
26
comment Are null references really a bad thing?
@dash-tom-bang, of course removing null refs changes the class of errors: the semantics in the system have changed. When devs no longer resort to null as a valid value in code they must pick another means of expressing their intent, but whatever it is, it won't be the same value throughout the system. Try it in your own code and you'll see.
May
26
comment Are null references really a bad thing?
@greenoldman, you are incorrect. NullObject is the standard answer in an object-oriented system. It is null reference which is not a remedy. Use of null reference will cost more in maintenance and debugging effort. By eliminating the use of, and testing for, null references in our code we simplify the logic and code flow. We also restrict the special cases to the null object. So we'll always know the current situation because an instance of the correct class is handling it.
May
18
comment Are there any unions for software developers?
You are entirely incorrect in your assertion that there are no professional associations for doctors, lawyers and engineers. In the USA there is the American Medical Association, the American Bar Association and the IEEE. Architects, accountants, and even beauticians also have their "unions". In addition to the professional code of ethics David Thornley pointed out, they define standards of practice (methodologies), conduct studies and research for the field, and even lobby lawmakers for their professions. They also are prohibited from setting wages.
Oct
11
awarded  Yearling
Jun
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
13
awarded  Student