1,831 reputation
4926
bio website linkedin.com/in/kevinmote
location United States
age
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen yesterday

I graduated from Washington State University in Computer Science (undergrad + masters). I've spent over 10 years in software development for a National Laboratory, a startup engineering company, and a nuclear processing plant. This has provided me with a diverse set of experiences and skills. I have worked extensively with C++ (w/ MFC, STL, & Boost), C#, Python, and Qt. I'm also comfortable with VB.Net, and HTML/XML, as well as tools like Visual Studio, JIRA, and Subversion. I have a strong background in mathematics & graphics and have delved into graph & network theory, information visualization, data analytics, SCADA/HMIs, and artificial intelligence.

Also, I'm not quite as old as I look.

http://kevinmote.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/kevinmote


Jan
21
comment What are the advantages to developing with outdated technologies?
@RobbieDee -that gives user114764 just enough time.
Jan
21
revised What are the advantages to developing with outdated technologies?
update
Jan
16
answered What are the advantages to developing with outdated technologies?
Nov
5
revised Is 500 million lines of code even remotely possible?
re-worded question to address moderators' concerns; attempted to focus the question in a more specific way
Nov
4
revised loc wiki excerpt
added 120 characters in body
Nov
4
comment Is 500 million lines of code even remotely possible?
@FrustratedWithFormsDesigner: Go ahead -- count it all. I still think getting all the way to 500M LOC (over 10x the size of Windows 7) seems preposterous. (Not to mention impossible).
Nov
4
wiki created loc excerpt
Nov
4
suggested approved edit on loc tag wiki excerpt
Nov
4
asked Is 500 million lines of code even remotely possible?
Oct
17
answered Stereo images rectification and disparity: which algorithms?
Sep
24
awarded  Great Question
Sep
19
comment Is it appropriate for interviewers to ask candidates for their Stack Exchange user name?
"I have never been employed to contribute to Stack-Exchange, and until that changes, it's completely part of my private, personal life." You make a strong point (and this is exactly the issue that I was wrestling with in my question). So does that mean that you would consider the following interview question overly intrusive: "Do you consider your SO/SE-Prog profile to be fairly representative of your professional expertise and communication skills?"
Sep
19
comment Is it appropriate for interviewers to ask candidates for their Stack Exchange user name?
@FrustratedWithFormsDesigner: Much better, thanks. +1 for the suggestion of asking "leading questions" first.
Sep
19
accepted Is it appropriate for interviewers to ask candidates for their Stack Exchange user name?
Sep
19
comment Is it appropriate for interviewers to ask candidates for their Stack Exchange user name?
@GlenH7 It was difficult to choose an "Accepted Answer" as so many people posted useful (and opposing) opinions on the matter. But I selected yours because of the effort you put into being thorough in your post and responsive in the comments. Thanks
Sep
19
comment Is it appropriate for interviewers to ask candidates for their Stack Exchange user name?
@psr I appreciate your dissenting view, and your point about potential discrimination issues is worth noting. (It has prompted me to submit this question to my HR department prior to my next interview.) But, personally, I agree with the other commenters here: if I'm not allowed to ask about anything the candidate didn't volunteer, I might as well pick a resume at random.
Sep
19
comment Is it appropriate for interviewers to ask candidates for their Stack Exchange user name?
@MikeS I appreciate your effort to voice the dissenting opinion, but I'm afraid you haven't convinced me. School is a place for learning too, but that doesn't mean I'm not interested in the candidate's GPA (another flawed metric, but still useful). You said it yourself, "As long as you've put in some effort to solve questions on your own, you shouldn't feel self-conscious about prospective employers reading them." As a prospective employer, I expect you to be asking questions; how else do you learn? And there's no better place to ask them than here.
Sep
19
comment Is it appropriate for interviewers to ask candidates for their Stack Exchange user name?
@jwenting, as the op, I am definitely NOT interested in using rep to guage candidates (although I can see why you might think so) as I agree that it would be a flawed metric. Rather, I am interested in seeing the candidate's history. How helpful, thoughtful, insightful, and educated they are; How well they communicate; how they have developed over time. If their history on the SO/SE sites extends more than a year or two, it would be very hard to "fake" those things or game the system.
Sep
19
comment Is it appropriate for interviewers to ask candidates for their Stack Exchange user name?
@FrustratedWithFormsDesigner: While I agree with your opinion, your answer didn't really address my question. I'm not asking whether it is a good strategy but whether it is culturally/socially appropriate. You answered in the affirmative, but didn't say why. Thanks for your thoughts though.
Sep
19
awarded  Notable Question