1,799 reputation
4925
bio website linkedin.com/in/kevinmote
location United States
age
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen yesterday

I graduated from Washington State University in Computer Science (undergrad + masters). I've spent over 10 years in software development for a National Laboratory, a startup engineering company, and a nuclear processing plant. This has provided me with a diverse set of experiences and skills. I have worked extensively with C++ (w/ MFC, STL, & Boost), C#, Python, and Qt. I'm also comfortable with VB.Net, and HTML/XML, as well as tools like Visual Studio, JIRA, and Subversion. I have a strong background in mathematics & graphics and have delved into graph & network theory, information visualization, data analytics, SCADA/HMIs, and artificial intelligence.

Also, I'm not quite as old as I look.

http://kevinmote.wordpress.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/kevinmote


Jun
17
comment invoking methods within a conditional expression
I appreciate your point of view and agree with your conclusions. I also agree that Hunt's excellent guide (which I use and recommend to others) is due for an updated version. Are you listening Lance?
Jun
16
comment invoking methods within a conditional expression
Ahh, I misunderstood Lance's statement altogether. (I thought he was discouraging if (x) doThis() else doThat(), which of course would be a completely untenable restriction.) Perhaps he could have reworded his guideline as "Avoid invoking methods within a boolean expression", but then again, I'm probably the only doofus who misunderstood. Thanks for a complete and thoughtful answer.
May
15
comment Helping someone who is not and never will be a professional programmer write code that is more legible and usable to use and interpret
I just added one last sentence in the 3rd point. Perhaps the most important of all. Re-read your post and honestly ask yourself if that's the way you are coming across to others.
Mar
18
comment Does Serialization preclude the use of Dependency Injection?
@RobertHarvey- OK. Lights are starting to come on. Perhaps I don't understand Serialization properly. I want to instantiate my objects based on a detailed xml configuration file. I thought I could get boost by using the built in Serialization tools. So for my purposes, nothing has been constructed before -- it's just been defined in an xml file. I was hoping that Serialization could automatically instantiate my objects, assuming I set up the xml file properly. Am I mistaken here?
Mar
18
comment Does Serialization preclude the use of Dependency Injection?
@RobertHarvey: I'm feeling a bit dense, but I don't quite get you. What's a "parameterized instructor"? (typo?) Once an object has been de-serialized, I can't construct it again. Are you suggesting I use property/setter injection on a default-consructed object?
Feb
25
comment ASP.Net or WPF(C#)?
It has been a few years now. I'd love to hear what your final decision was, and how it worked out for you.
Feb
21
comment How to manage accidental complexity in software projects
Ahh, but you seem to have been able to write a clean answer to this question on your first try. (And a very cogent one, at that.) Maybe you're just Feynman in disguise.
Feb
21
comment How to manage accidental complexity in software projects
@pdr: As a dev lead, I am considering a requirement for interns and rookies that peer assistance requests are put in writing for precisely that reason. (It sounds a bit draconian, so I probably won't enforce it, but the lesson is a powerful one.)
Feb
6
comment When do you rebuild an application or keep on fixing the existing one
@WarrenP, I agree with Peter: When the code contains hundreds of huge monolithic functions, highly coupled in a tangled spaghetti of undocumented connections (combined with stratified layers of unused boneyard code), creating unit tests can be more demanding than a re-write
Jan
21
comment What are the advantages to developing with outdated technologies?
@RobbieDee -that gives user114764 just enough time.
Nov
4
comment Is 500 million lines of code even remotely possible?
@FrustratedWithFormsDesigner: Go ahead -- count it all. I still think getting all the way to 500M LOC (over 10x the size of Windows 7) seems preposterous. (Not to mention impossible).
Sep
19
comment Is it appropriate for interviewers to ask candidates for their Stack Exchange user name?
"I have never been employed to contribute to Stack-Exchange, and until that changes, it's completely part of my private, personal life." You make a strong point (and this is exactly the issue that I was wrestling with in my question). So does that mean that you would consider the following interview question overly intrusive: "Do you consider your SO/SE-Prog profile to be fairly representative of your professional expertise and communication skills?"
Sep
19
comment Is it appropriate for interviewers to ask candidates for their Stack Exchange user name?
@FrustratedWithFormsDesigner: Much better, thanks. +1 for the suggestion of asking "leading questions" first.
Sep
19
comment Is it appropriate for interviewers to ask candidates for their Stack Exchange user name?
@GlenH7 It was difficult to choose an "Accepted Answer" as so many people posted useful (and opposing) opinions on the matter. But I selected yours because of the effort you put into being thorough in your post and responsive in the comments. Thanks
Sep
19
comment Is it appropriate for interviewers to ask candidates for their Stack Exchange user name?
@psr I appreciate your dissenting view, and your point about potential discrimination issues is worth noting. (It has prompted me to submit this question to my HR department prior to my next interview.) But, personally, I agree with the other commenters here: if I'm not allowed to ask about anything the candidate didn't volunteer, I might as well pick a resume at random.
Sep
19
comment Is it appropriate for interviewers to ask candidates for their Stack Exchange user name?
@MikeS I appreciate your effort to voice the dissenting opinion, but I'm afraid you haven't convinced me. School is a place for learning too, but that doesn't mean I'm not interested in the candidate's GPA (another flawed metric, but still useful). You said it yourself, "As long as you've put in some effort to solve questions on your own, you shouldn't feel self-conscious about prospective employers reading them." As a prospective employer, I expect you to be asking questions; how else do you learn? And there's no better place to ask them than here.
Sep
19
comment Is it appropriate for interviewers to ask candidates for their Stack Exchange user name?
@jwenting, as the op, I am definitely NOT interested in using rep to guage candidates (although I can see why you might think so) as I agree that it would be a flawed metric. Rather, I am interested in seeing the candidate's history. How helpful, thoughtful, insightful, and educated they are; How well they communicate; how they have developed over time. If their history on the SO/SE sites extends more than a year or two, it would be very hard to "fake" those things or game the system.
Sep
19
comment Is it appropriate for interviewers to ask candidates for their Stack Exchange user name?
@FrustratedWithFormsDesigner: While I agree with your opinion, your answer didn't really address my question. I'm not asking whether it is a good strategy but whether it is culturally/socially appropriate. You answered in the affirmative, but didn't say why. Thanks for your thoughts though.
Sep
18
comment Is it appropriate for interviewers to ask candidates for their Stack Exchange user name?
While I can appreciate how a candidate might be self-conscious about a potential employer seeing their history of questions, as the interviewer I don't really care about their "dumb questions" (I have asked plenty myself). I'd be a little more concerned about their dumb answers. But mostly I'd just like to see how their development has evolved. (But of course, there's no way the candidate can know my motivations, so your concern is valid.)
Aug
15
comment What to do if the task is too difficult ? Internship/SummerTraining
Well, it's been two months. I'd sure love to hear how it all turned out. Can you give us the debrief?