1,801 reputation
1224
bio website verdewek.com/work
location Galicia, Spain
age 46
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen 7 hours ago

I am a researcher at Incipit, where I read, write, think, have coffee and also write code every now and then.

I have extensive experience in method engineering, software methodologies, conceptual modelling, software development techniques, technical writing and project management.

I'm also a partner in two businesses where we develop large software applications and services, and I participate in standardisation projects with ISO and AENOR.

You can also find me on LinkedIn and I keep a couple of blogs.


Jul
18
awarded  Mortarboard
Jul
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
17
answered Is it beneficial to read old Java programming books?
Jul
9
comment What can a senior programmer do that a junior can't?
Thanks for the comment. I think that change you just made clarifies things a bit. To me, expertise can be about anything: you can be an expert in C# but also an expert in database design. Experience is something else; it relates to having done something many times and having developed certain intuition as to what works and what doesn't. Since you ask, I would suggest focussing on this distinction rather than on the programmng vs. other stuff.
Jul
9
comment What can a senior programmer do that a junior can't?
-1 I disagree. Programmng is much more than knowing the language and the framwork, and hence there is a large difference in expertise (as well as experience) between senior and junior developers. This expertise may not be about languages and framworks, but about engineering and design.
Jul
7
comment What is the *correct* term for a program that makes use of multiple hardware processor cores?
@Ryan Thompson: Arguably, yes. Multithreading is often defined as the model where multiple threads are shared by a single process; in your case, it is a program which shares multiple processes, and each process contains a single thread. Although this does not fit the most common form of multithreading, I don't see anything wrong with it.
Jul
3
revised What is the *correct* term for a program that makes use of multiple hardware processor cores?
Reworded according to question edit.
Jul
2
comment What is the *correct* term for a program that makes use of multiple hardware processor cores?
@edA-qa mort-ora-y: Regarding consensus, I think it's good to take into account, because that's how knowledge progresses. I answered the question using computer science accepted consensus as support; you are free to answer the question differently, of course.
Jul
2
comment What is the *correct* term for a program that makes use of multiple hardware processor cores?
@edA-qa mort-ora-y: Your program is multi-threaded. Each process contains at least one thread, so multiple processes => multiple threads.
Jul
2
comment What is the *correct* term for a program that makes use of multiple hardware processor cores?
@edA-qa mort-ora-y: In computing, "process" is usually defined as "an instance of a program that is being executed". If we agree on this, then multiple processes could never be part of the same running program; each one corresponds to a separate running program, regardless of whether they have been forked from one another or not. Of course, you may not agree with the definition of process, but that's deviating too much from the general consensus in computer science; see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Process_(computing)
Jul
1
comment What is the *correct* term for a program that makes use of multiple hardware processor cores?
@quickly_now: Yes, I know that. I was trying to make some systematic definitions.
Jul
1
comment What is the *correct* term for a program that makes use of multiple hardware processor cores?
Asynchronous means that the program does not wait for a call to complete after it's made and keeps running; it doesn't relate to the way in which work is distributed across cores.
Jul
1
answered What is the *correct* term for a program that makes use of multiple hardware processor cores?
Jun
25
comment TDD vs. Productivity
You don't have 100% confidence even with 100% of test coverage. That's testing 101. Tests cannot demonstrate that the code is defect-free; on the contrary, they can only demonstrate that it does contain defects.
Jun
15
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
4
comment Login using email or username?
@Developer Art: It may as well. :-)
Jun
4
comment Login using email or username?
@Developer Art: I understand that, and it's a valid point. However, and in my experience, most users I've interviewed in the context of business-oriented systems find that duplicity confusing and cumbersome. Due to the fact that the screen name is what the user ends up seeing all day long, a very common phenomenon that we found to happen was that users tried to log in by typing their screen name, forgetting that they had a separate, different login name. That's why I am saying that a single name is better.
Jun
4
comment Login using email or username?
@Developer Art: I don't disagree with your views that using a login name is better than using an email address. However, I do disagree with your third point. I think that you are thinking like a programmer, rather than a user. After extensive experience with usability testing, I have found that most people are confused if a system keeps separate login and display names. It becomes cumbersome to maintain. The KISS principle applies here.
Mar
22
comment Why do game developers prefer Windows?
Virus developers also prefer Windows. It's all about the user base.
Mar
18
answered In times where there are lot of cloud based hostings what would still make you go for dedicated or vps hosting?