1,840 reputation
1325
bio website about.me/cesargon
location Galicia, Spain
age 47
visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen Nov 13 at 13:57

I am a researcher at Incipit, where I read, write, think, have coffee and also write code every now and then.

I have experience in method engineering, software methodologies, conceptual modelling, software development techniques, cultural heritage, technical writing and project management.

I'm also a partner in two businesses where we develop large software applications and services, and I participate in standardisation projects with ISO and AENOR.

You can also find me on LinkedIn and I keep a couple of blogs.


Aug
11
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
10
comment Moving from academics to workforce
Academics are part of the workforce. You probably mean "industry" as opposed to "academia". :-)
Aug
9
answered Doctoral research and work for a company with similar profile
Aug
9
comment Is it possible to be agile without use cases and tests?
Well, use cases were invented in the mid-1980s, and software had been developed successfully well before that, so I guess software can definitely be built without use cases. Probably not without requirements, but without use cases, yes. Regarding testing, it's been said millions of times that testing can only demonstrate that there is a bug in a program, but it can't prove that there isn't one. My point is, testing is a very important approach to improving the quality of software today, but not the only one and perhaps not even the best.
Aug
4
comment TDD negative experience
@Adam Jaskiewicz: I love the "no upfront planning" thing. C'mon, planning is upfront by definition. If you don't plan beforehand but during the event you are not planning at all; you are improvising. ;-)
Jul
18
awarded  Mortarboard
Jul
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
17
answered Is it beneficial to read old Java programming books?
Jul
9
comment What can a senior programmer do that a junior can't?
Thanks for the comment. I think that change you just made clarifies things a bit. To me, expertise can be about anything: you can be an expert in C# but also an expert in database design. Experience is something else; it relates to having done something many times and having developed certain intuition as to what works and what doesn't. Since you ask, I would suggest focussing on this distinction rather than on the programmng vs. other stuff.
Jul
9
comment What can a senior programmer do that a junior can't?
-1 I disagree. Programmng is much more than knowing the language and the framwork, and hence there is a large difference in expertise (as well as experience) between senior and junior developers. This expertise may not be about languages and framworks, but about engineering and design.
Jul
7
comment What is the *correct* term for a program that makes use of multiple hardware processor cores?
@Ryan Thompson: Arguably, yes. Multithreading is often defined as the model where multiple threads are shared by a single process; in your case, it is a program which shares multiple processes, and each process contains a single thread. Although this does not fit the most common form of multithreading, I don't see anything wrong with it.
Jul
3
revised What is the *correct* term for a program that makes use of multiple hardware processor cores?
Reworded according to question edit.
Jul
2
comment What is the *correct* term for a program that makes use of multiple hardware processor cores?
@edA-qa mort-ora-y: Regarding consensus, I think it's good to take into account, because that's how knowledge progresses. I answered the question using computer science accepted consensus as support; you are free to answer the question differently, of course.
Jul
2
comment What is the *correct* term for a program that makes use of multiple hardware processor cores?
@edA-qa mort-ora-y: Your program is multi-threaded. Each process contains at least one thread, so multiple processes => multiple threads.
Jul
2
comment What is the *correct* term for a program that makes use of multiple hardware processor cores?
@edA-qa mort-ora-y: In computing, "process" is usually defined as "an instance of a program that is being executed". If we agree on this, then multiple processes could never be part of the same running program; each one corresponds to a separate running program, regardless of whether they have been forked from one another or not. Of course, you may not agree with the definition of process, but that's deviating too much from the general consensus in computer science; see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Process_(computing)
Jul
1
comment What is the *correct* term for a program that makes use of multiple hardware processor cores?
@quickly_now: Yes, I know that. I was trying to make some systematic definitions.
Jul
1
comment What is the *correct* term for a program that makes use of multiple hardware processor cores?
Asynchronous means that the program does not wait for a call to complete after it's made and keeps running; it doesn't relate to the way in which work is distributed across cores.
Jul
1
answered What is the *correct* term for a program that makes use of multiple hardware processor cores?
Jun
25
comment TDD vs. Productivity
You don't have 100% confidence even with 100% of test coverage. That's testing 101. Tests cannot demonstrate that the code is defect-free; on the contrary, they can only demonstrate that it does contain defects.
Jun
15
awarded  Popular Question