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Mar
15
comment Is Agile the new micromanagement?
"It is absolutely against the very first principle of the <XXX> Manifesto"; replace anything for XXX, and you'll have your choice cult. ;-) Seriously, doesn't this make you wonder?
Mar
15
comment Is Agile the new micromanagement?
+1, especially for "I always thought the agile was supposed to bring harmony in the development teams which results in happy developers". LOL.
Mar
6
awarded  Enthusiast
Feb
22
comment UML: Going from Use Case to Class Diagram
@Martin Wickman: OK, I agree that approach may work for extremely simple systems. But real-life, complex, business-critical systems (not to mention life-critical or avionics, for example) are not that simplistic. You really want a solid method that takes you from a user-centred, functional description such as use cases to a solution-centred, structural specification such as a class model.
Feb
20
comment UML: Going from Use Case to Class Diagram
@Gabriel Ščerbák: I agree that there is no trivial mapping between use cases and classes. But forward and backward traceability can be achieved (see materials referenced in my answer), and I find it's often necessary.
Feb
20
comment UML: Going from Use Case to Class Diagram
@Gabriel Ščerbák: Fair enough. :-)
Feb
20
revised Why does TDD work?
Added note on "driven" vs. "test".
Feb
20
comment Why does TDD work?
@Inca: You say "TDD is testing the design". But I think TDD is more than that; it is driving the design by testing. Any testing is testing the design; you don't need to do TDD for that. What worries me about TDD is not the "test" bit, but the "driven" one.
Feb
20
comment Why does TDD work?
Can you support that claim with some evidence, data or solid analysis?
Feb
20
comment UML: Going from Use Case to Class Diagram
@Dunk: +1 for "the Use-Case Diagram itself is just a step above useless".
Feb
20
comment UML: Going from Use Case to Class Diagram
Yes, CRC is useful, no doubt about that. My point is that you need something else in addition to CRC whenever you want to move past certain point into detailed design.
Feb
20
comment UML: Going from Use Case to Class Diagram
@Gabriel Ščerbák: Yes, it is one specific way. But it is the only specific way that I've found to be systematically successful after 15 years of trying alternatives. Do you know of any alternative ways of doing it?
Feb
20
comment UML: Going from Use Case to Class Diagram
Well, I (and a few teams and organisations) have been successfully using use cases as the primary source of input for OO design for over 15 years. The presentation and the white paper that I mention in my answer here on this page contain the details.
Feb
20
comment UML: Going from Use Case to Class Diagram
In my experience (see slides referred to in my answer on this page), a large proportion of classes in the system are nothing to do with the application domain. And CRC is good at finding application domain classes, but quite bad at discovering classes beyond that. For this reason, CRC is not enough, and I think that alternative techniques are necessary.
Feb
20
comment UML: Going from Use Case to Class Diagram
@Martin Wickman: I imagine you are kidding, right?
Feb
18
comment UML: Going from Use Case to Class Diagram
The diagram type is a service state diagram. You can find it documented in the OPEN/Metis White Paper (verdewek.com/openmetis/Download/OPENMetisWhitePaper.zip).
Feb
18
answered UML: Going from Use Case to Class Diagram
Feb
17
comment Method chaining vs encapsulation
@Oak: Doing anything blindly is never good. One needs to look at pros and cons and make decisions based on evidence. This includes the Law of Demeter, as well.
Feb
16
answered Method chaining vs encapsulation
Feb
11
comment Why is OOP difficult?
-1 Design patterns are so overemphasised today. They are important, sure, but: first, they are important to all paradigms: functional, structured, as well as OO; and second, they are not part of the paradigm, just a convenient add-on that you can use, as many others. @SoftwareRockstar explains this nicely in his/her answer.