1,828 reputation
1224
bio website about.me/cesargon
location Galicia, Spain
age 46
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen 2 days ago

I am a researcher at Incipit, where I read, write, think, have coffee and also write code every now and then.

I have experience in method engineering, software methodologies, conceptual modelling, software development techniques, cultural heritage, technical writing and project management.

I'm also a partner in two businesses where we develop large software applications and services, and I participate in standardisation projects with ISO and AENOR.

You can also find me on LinkedIn and I keep a couple of blogs.


Jun
4
comment Login using email or username?
@Developer Art: I understand that, and it's a valid point. However, and in my experience, most users I've interviewed in the context of business-oriented systems find that duplicity confusing and cumbersome. Due to the fact that the screen name is what the user ends up seeing all day long, a very common phenomenon that we found to happen was that users tried to log in by typing their screen name, forgetting that they had a separate, different login name. That's why I am saying that a single name is better.
Jun
4
comment Login using email or username?
@Developer Art: I don't disagree with your views that using a login name is better than using an email address. However, I do disagree with your third point. I think that you are thinking like a programmer, rather than a user. After extensive experience with usability testing, I have found that most people are confused if a system keeps separate login and display names. It becomes cumbersome to maintain. The KISS principle applies here.
Mar
22
comment Why do game developers prefer Windows?
Virus developers also prefer Windows. It's all about the user base.
Mar
18
answered In times where there are lot of cloud based hostings what would still make you go for dedicated or vps hosting?
Mar
17
comment Is Agile the new micromanagement?
@Berin Loritsch: I do give you credit; it wasn't my intention to appear otherwise. My initial remark about cults tried to sound partially joking, actually. The point I am trying to make is that we don't need a few lines on a manifesto to defend something that is blatantly against common sense. The OP describes a situation that makes all alarms ring. I hope you take it nicely; sorry if I was too harsh. :-)
Mar
16
comment Is Agile the new micromanagement?
@Berin Loritsch: I hear you. But the Agile Manifesto, as any other manifesto, is a broad generalisation of a much more complex world. Boldly declaring "Individuals and interactions over processes and tools" and making that a guiding principle is, pretty much, putting on a nice pair of blinders that hide the fine nuances of the real world. That's what cults do: everything is either black or white; you are agile or you are not; there are no greys, no mid-tones, no unlabelled things. C'mon.
Mar
15
comment Is Agile the new micromanagement?
"It is absolutely against the very first principle of the <XXX> Manifesto"; replace anything for XXX, and you'll have your choice cult. ;-) Seriously, doesn't this make you wonder?
Mar
15
comment Is Agile the new micromanagement?
+1, especially for "I always thought the agile was supposed to bring harmony in the development teams which results in happy developers". LOL.
Mar
6
awarded  Enthusiast
Feb
26
comment For those of you who are senior developers what do you look for in a new company and development team?
@Amy P: You're welcome. :-)
Feb
25
comment For those of you who are senior developers what do you look for in a new company and development team?
@Amy P: I am not saying that I wouldn't be flexible. I am sayinig that I don't expect that my company asks me to be as flexible as junior people who are still learning things that I have already mastered. But, if the company asks, then I think I should oblige in most occasions, even knowing that it may be a not very wise move overall.
Feb
22
comment UML: Going from Use Case to Class Diagram
@Martin Wickman: OK, I agree that approach may work for extremely simple systems. But real-life, complex, business-critical systems (not to mention life-critical or avionics, for example) are not that simplistic. You really want a solid method that takes you from a user-centred, functional description such as use cases to a solution-centred, structural specification such as a class model.
Feb
20
comment UML: Going from Use Case to Class Diagram
@Gabriel Ščerbák: I agree that there is no trivial mapping between use cases and classes. But forward and backward traceability can be achieved (see materials referenced in my answer), and I find it's often necessary.
Feb
20
comment UML: Going from Use Case to Class Diagram
@Gabriel Ščerbák: Fair enough. :-)
Feb
20
revised Why does TDD work?
Added note on "driven" vs. "test".
Feb
20
comment Why does TDD work?
@Inca: You say "TDD is testing the design". But I think TDD is more than that; it is driving the design by testing. Any testing is testing the design; you don't need to do TDD for that. What worries me about TDD is not the "test" bit, but the "driven" one.
Feb
20
comment Why does TDD work?
Can you support that claim with some evidence, data or solid analysis?
Feb
20
comment UML: Going from Use Case to Class Diagram
@Dunk: +1 for "the Use-Case Diagram itself is just a step above useless".
Feb
20
comment UML: Going from Use Case to Class Diagram
Yes, CRC is useful, no doubt about that. My point is that you need something else in addition to CRC whenever you want to move past certain point into detailed design.
Feb
20
comment UML: Going from Use Case to Class Diagram
@Gabriel Ščerbák: Yes, it is one specific way. But it is the only specific way that I've found to be systematically successful after 15 years of trying alternatives. Do you know of any alternative ways of doing it?