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Mar
14
comment Employee vs Contractor mentality and career
@junky: I'm a bit of a "simple living" nut. Not a hardcore hippy or anything, but I live pretty simply by first world standards. So after 10 years of being on a professional salary while living on essentially minimum wage expenses - I had some savings. As well as some investments which I could liquify. :)
Dec
10
comment Do companies care about university grades when hiring programmers?
@Stephen Gross: Hmmm, I don't think so. Then again, IANAL so I'm not sure if this can be legally done without "submitting to it" as such in Australia. Knowing how paranoid the privacy laws are here, I'd be surprised if there was some kind of "companies can do it by default" clause in the law. So long story short - no.
Sep
25
comment Whats the difference between a Software Architect, a Software Engineer, and a Software Developer (Programmer)?
@Sarawut: "My two cents". It just means "this is my opinion". :)
Aug
15
comment Will it ever be possible to build quality websites with editors alone, without needing to know HTML?
I use WordPress. It's great as long as you're doing something that it supports, but as soon as you want to tweak something in a way which goes against the grain, it becomes a nightmare. In any case, I agree with Wayne M's answer - the whole thing can be a bit of a trap. And it's definitely annoying how it makes non-"computer people" think that building web applications is easy.
Aug
10
comment Importance of hobby projects
@Marjan Venema: Absolutely. I've had a few that did. But it can be a bit of "you get what you put in" too. Which in a couple of my previous jobs was definitely a failure on my part to make the most of them.
Aug
10
comment Importance of hobby projects
+1 for "Only doing your 9-5 daily grind can stagnate you as a developer".
Jun
30
comment Is it normal for a company to have programmers on such a rigid schedule?
@btilly: I agree in general, but it's not always practical. The particular workplace I'm talking about is an example where it was very hard to do anything useful remotely. Dealing with a nasty support issue was highly dependent on having full, uninhibited, real time onsite access to the production environment. A cellphone conversation about the description of the symptoms of the problem was next to useless. Granted this is only applicable to certain types of work. It might be totally adequate in many other cases.
Jun
20
comment What are the downsides of RoR?
+1 for books rather than online tutes.
Jun
20
comment What are the downsides of RoR?
+1 for control freak. I have a bit of that streak too. Not just for strong type, but also - I actually in a way like configuration (despite the verbosity), rather than conventions making assumptions for me.
Jun
18
comment Is programming as a career in the US being hurt by competition from programmers in India?
+1 for "there are always enough bodies to fill seats". This is why I think it's always dubious when people talk about skills shortages in IT/development. I don't think it's so much a shortage of butts to put in seats as it's a shortage of people who are proven, and who tick all the boxes (in the many cases where non-technical HR people filter applicants, etc).
Jun
14
comment Working with fubar/refuctored code
+1. I've worked at jobs where the code sucked and caused people to leave (and I left for better code too). I agree with Jason Baker though - it's usually more a symptom of the Dead Sea Effect than just bad code existing in isolation somehow.
Jun
11
comment How to sell a high SO reputation at an interview
@Marek: It can go the other way. Joel Spolsky for example thinks the opposite. Basically that spending all day on SO and getting a high reputation probably means that the person is a great programmer, but working in a crappy job (check out the comment thread of that post). programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/20407/…
Jun
9
comment Why does adding more resource to a late project make it later?
+1. This was a major issue at my last job. The management was in mega "man month adding" craze for a major project without thinking things through. At one point, our team got drilled for being slow - because our stuff needed to integrate with that major project. But then, the new hires on the major project couldn't get up to speed fast enough, so WE got too far ahead (on stuff that needed their backends completed). At one point we were developing front ends for half-baked backends and test harnesses. Not a good flow.
Jun
6
comment Is it “normal” for people to not work?
+1. I just finished reading the book recently. Highly recommended, very in-depth explanations of all the findings: amazon.com/Drive-Surprising-Truth-About-Motivates/dp/1594488843
Jun
6
comment Do some programmers know some secrets that we others don't?
@webbiedave: Both. Using obscure tricks and constructs, as well as seemingly deliberately making code hard to understand (obtuse). Some people like this seem to want to be elitist hackers of sorts - like code that's simple to read is some kind of defeat, while hard to understand code is their special esoteric jargon.
Jun
3
comment Is it better to specialize in a single field I like, or expand into other fields to broaden my horizons?
@Jon: Good point. I've edited that out.
May
30
comment How to foster intrinsic motivation in a software team
+1 Absolutely true. After ten years in this industry of never really being 100% happy with my jobs (while at the same time loving programming in its pure sense) I've come to realise this is the key. Put me on some random boring business system and I'll be miserable, demotivated, and unproductive, and eventually burn out. Put me on something where the coding is for a problem domain I enjoy, and a cause I believe in, and I'll be a rockstar.
May
24
comment Will a computer science college degree ever hurt my employability?
+1. Very true. Interestingly, I've seen senior lifers in industry say some pretty insane things too. I guess the common theme is not having to develop adaptability. eg "Business programming begins and ends with COBOL." I guess if that's all you know and you will retire soon maintaining COBOL code, it doesn't matter.
May
23
comment Will a computer science college degree ever hurt my employability?
@Rein Henrichs: You're right. I've fixed it. I knew "exception which proves the rule" felt wrong and awkward, but I was tired at the time and it sort of seemed to make sense. :)
May
18
comment Complexity point of no return. What do you call that?
At my last work, I don't think there's any maintenance commit that anyone ever did with the belief that it was an improvement to the codebase.