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Jun
19
comment Recognizing text fields according to their label value
If you know the field names, then you can just pull each one out to a string and perform whatever test it is directly on the string value.
Jun
19
answered Recognizing text fields according to their label value
Jun
19
comment Benefits of classic OOP over Go-like language
Did OOP make procedural programming obsolete? I hate to sound pedantic or that I'm talking down to you, but that was the first sentence that came to mind. Go provides a new(ish) paradigm. With experimentation, users will find out what it's good at and what it's not good at (as with all paradigms and languages), and we'll end up with hundreds of great products (along with it's fair share of bad products) written in Go. At least, that's my opinion
Jun
19
comment Why is x=x++ undefined?
In my mind, this is a good question ("Some men see things as they are and ask why, I dream things that never were and ask why not"). It's (in my opinion) a question purely on language design, using C syntax as an example, not a question on C syntax. I, personally, think that the reason we don't have defined behaviour for expressions such as x++ + ++x or x=x++ is simply because there is a possibility of them being misread.
Jun
18
comment Dynamic Post-build event in Visual Studio
How about including a script that is called by the SDK project at compile/build that calls the script for the Video Server project? Assuming that the script for the Video Server project is always in the same place.
Jun
12
comment What is the meaning of the sentence “we wanted it to be compiled so it’s not burning CPU doing the wrong stuff.”
This is an amazing description
Jun
8
comment As a programmer how do I plan to learn new things in my spare time
Well, there's codereview.stackexchange.com (another section of Stack Exchange), they can help you with reviewing your own code.
Jun
8
comment I've released a software product - how do I maximize exposure given no budget and limited time?
+1 for being one of the most in-depth answer I've come across on Stack Exchange that doesn't come off as preachy or condescending
Jun
8
comment As a programmer how do I plan to learn new things in my spare time
@priyankpatel No worries, dude. It's the thought that counts
Jun
8
answered As a programmer how do I plan to learn new things in my spare time
Jun
7
comment Why is the “kill” command called so?
+1 for confusing me with yes also meaning no
Jun
7
answered On mobile is there a reason why processes are often short lived and must persist their state explicitly?
Jun
7
comment On mobile is there a reason why processes are often short lived and must persist their state explicitly?
So, you want an infinite amount of swap space to persistently store app states in? You can't guarantee that the user will even have a memory card installed, so where do you propose that the state of an app that was loaded 23 hours ago, run for 30 seconds, and generated 2Mb of data is stored? Also, how much battery power will it take to, constantly move this information around?
May
30
comment What is the role of C++ today?
the C family of languages are the backbone of current coding (in my opinion). You want some driver code? C/C++ You want some low-level firmware? C/C++ You want some super-fast math code? C/C++ You want to write some libraries for games? C/C++. Don't get me wrong, other languages have their uses. You want portable code? Java You want a web app? Asp.Net/JavaScript/HTML/CSS. Languages are the tools that we use, and it's up to us to choose the tool that we feel best fits the current task. You can use a hammer as a drill, and a drill as a hammer - there are pros and cons to both.
May
30
comment practical way to learn C?
I agree with zvrba. C is great for low-level, fast stuff and for driver code. If you're writing code for games, it's also great (although, you'd probably be working with C++ coders who'll complain at you for writing "non-standard" code). I do feel, though, that Assembly and C are similar to Latin (in spoken languages), they weren't the first, but most that came after them used the ideas and constructs from them to create their own languages. Thus, studying C MIGHT give you a better understanding of higher level languages
May
30
comment practical way to learn C?
I'd also add that (if you're feeling brave enough) you can take a look at one of the biggest open source, C based, projects: Linux.
May
30
comment practical way to learn C?
+1for KnR C. It's the best (and most concise) introduction to programming in a specific language I've ever read. As other's have pointed out, it can be a little dubious in places - the one piece of advice I'd give is this: if there ever was a programming manual that required you to read the surrounding blurb, this is it. Other's you can, usually, figure out from the code block, but this book requires that you read it cover-to-cover, at least, once.
May
30
comment Why is the “kill” command called so?
(hyperbole) Although I have very little experience with straight Unix, could it be related to the brevity of command names? Most commands have very short names "man", "ls", "cd" "mkdir" for instance. Maybe it's related to the 80 column limit for terminals. Again, I can't be sure as I've not got a huge amount of experience with straight Unix
May
24
awarded  Critic
May
21
comment Excellent knowledge of C++
Excellent is a relative term, in my mind. Take someone who is new to programming/ComSci and show them someone who has a passing knowledge of C++ developing some code. Take another person with a similar background and show him Denis Ritchie playing with C. Who has excellent knowledge of C++? to both of the newbies (hate that term), both will have excellent knowledge. Do the same thing with two people who have written C++ for x years. who has excellent knowledge of C++?