425 reputation
210
bio website gaprogman.com
location Hull, United Kingdom
age 28
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen Nov 7 at 14:42

Jun
7
comment On mobile is there a reason why processes are often short lived and must persist their state explicitly?
So, you want an infinite amount of swap space to persistently store app states in? You can't guarantee that the user will even have a memory card installed, so where do you propose that the state of an app that was loaded 23 hours ago, run for 30 seconds, and generated 2Mb of data is stored? Also, how much battery power will it take to, constantly move this information around?
May
30
comment What is the role of C++ today?
the C family of languages are the backbone of current coding (in my opinion). You want some driver code? C/C++ You want some low-level firmware? C/C++ You want some super-fast math code? C/C++ You want to write some libraries for games? C/C++. Don't get me wrong, other languages have their uses. You want portable code? Java You want a web app? Asp.Net/JavaScript/HTML/CSS. Languages are the tools that we use, and it's up to us to choose the tool that we feel best fits the current task. You can use a hammer as a drill, and a drill as a hammer - there are pros and cons to both.
May
30
comment practical way to learn C?
I agree with zvrba. C is great for low-level, fast stuff and for driver code. If you're writing code for games, it's also great (although, you'd probably be working with C++ coders who'll complain at you for writing "non-standard" code). I do feel, though, that Assembly and C are similar to Latin (in spoken languages), they weren't the first, but most that came after them used the ideas and constructs from them to create their own languages. Thus, studying C MIGHT give you a better understanding of higher level languages
May
30
comment practical way to learn C?
I'd also add that (if you're feeling brave enough) you can take a look at one of the biggest open source, C based, projects: Linux.
May
30
comment practical way to learn C?
+1for KnR C. It's the best (and most concise) introduction to programming in a specific language I've ever read. As other's have pointed out, it can be a little dubious in places - the one piece of advice I'd give is this: if there ever was a programming manual that required you to read the surrounding blurb, this is it. Other's you can, usually, figure out from the code block, but this book requires that you read it cover-to-cover, at least, once.
May
30
comment Is it acceptable that after reading a certain technology in a book, you put it in your resume as a skill?
+1 for Always tell the truth on your resume. I worked alongside a careers advisor for a year (as his IT support guy) and the big thing he told his clients was "NEVER, under any circumstances, use unsubstantiated superlatives. Always provide some proof, or a link to some proof. And NEVER lie on a CV (resume), you will ALWAYS be found out"
May
30
comment Why is the “kill” command called so?
(hyperbole) Although I have very little experience with straight Unix, could it be related to the brevity of command names? Most commands have very short names "man", "ls", "cd" "mkdir" for instance. Maybe it's related to the 80 column limit for terminals. Again, I can't be sure as I've not got a huge amount of experience with straight Unix
May
24
awarded  Critic
May
21
comment Excellent knowledge of C++
Excellent is a relative term, in my mind. Take someone who is new to programming/ComSci and show them someone who has a passing knowledge of C++ developing some code. Take another person with a similar background and show him Denis Ritchie playing with C. Who has excellent knowledge of C++? to both of the newbies (hate that term), both will have excellent knowledge. Do the same thing with two people who have written C++ for x years. who has excellent knowledge of C++?
May
21
comment How to prevent piracy on software which is sold online?
@DeadMG proving Jeanne Boyarsky's point exactly. I agree with what you say, though. Piracy is a service problem. I know plenty of guys who have paid top dollar for a chip reader for their CPUs so that they can make binary dumps of groups of instructions running on DRM protected programs just so that they can crack them, themselves. And they're only doing it, as you say, for fun.
May
17
comment Is it wise for a high level developer to spend time studying assembly?
+1 for "knowledge of low level stuff is important". Also @yzorg: for me, that link doesn't work
May
17
comment Is it wise for a high level developer to spend time studying assembly?
My first (taught) language was an assembly dialect. I can see how it would be useful (in the plethora of ways that others have pointed out), and it helps you to provide different input for the rest of the team.
May
15
revised When should I backup files?
Added a link to a related video
May
15
comment Why is 80 characters the 'standard' limit for code width?
An old lecturer of mine gave me one of his old punch cards, I have no idea what the code represented on it does, but it makes a great bookmark and conversation piece. I was thinking of laminating it for posterity, but was afraid that it'd ruin it.
May
15
comment Do you use interface as tagging system for the code?
This.VoteLevel++; Seriously though I try to insist on, at least, this when I work on some kind of code. Good design and documentation save bad code every time & bad design and documentation kills good code every time - IMHO
May
15
answered When should I backup files?
May
10
comment Is it normal to feel like you forgot many things in language after a lapse?
It's the same with any skill: if you don't use it for a long period of time, you'll start to forget how to do it. It's how the brain works, keeping the most relevant, up to date information readily available for when we need it and pushing the older stuff to the bottom of the stack.
May
9
answered Do you perfect your code as you go or FINISH the product first, improve structure later
May
9
awarded  Commentator
May
1
comment Is there an infinite amount of knowledge in a programming language?
My feeling is, that as long as a programmer has the basics of software developement/CompSci under their belt then they should be able to switch between languages as and when necessary. Imagine a plumber who has only ever used one type of wrench - they've used that wrench to fix all kinds of plumbing problems for 5 years. Then they are given a completely different kind of wrench... one with a hammer on it (as a stupid example), that plumber can use their previous knowledge to figure out how to use the new one. It's a bad example, I know. Can you tell that I don't do plumbing?