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bio website apsillers.github.io
location United States
age 26
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen 11 hours ago

"The problem, when solved, will be simple."

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2d
comment Am I legally responsible if people post links to illegal stuff on my website?
You may be interested in committing to the Law Stack Exchange proposal on Area 51.
Apr
21
answered Do legal names matter with source code licensing in the USA?
Apr
21
comment Do legal names matter with source code licensing in the USA?
Does your question assume that the contributor psedononymously submitted a CLA, or that a pseudonymous contributor does not submit a CLA? Are you asking what happens if a contributor does not submit a CLA (and that contributor happens to be pseudonymous), or whether pseudonymously-signed CLAs are legally binding?
Apr
8
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
5
awarded  Yearling
Apr
3
awarded  licensing
Apr
3
answered Is it actually possible (practically) to sell Open Source software?
Apr
2
comment MIT vs. BSD vs. Dual License
Point #2 (BSD code cannot be included in MIT code) runs contrary to every piece of information I've ever read about 3-clause and 2-clause BSD. Point #2 would be true about the (now-ancient and forgotten) 4-clause BSD, but the OP has made it clear this question is not about the 4-clause BSD. It seems quite harmful to have such a hugely misleading piece of information in an otherwise very good and credible answer.
Apr
2
comment License terms when porting free software to another language
@FrankHileman Copyright certainly applies to creative notional content as well; cf. (to pick one example) Anderson v. Stallone in which the defendant wrote a Rocky sequel and was found guilty of infringement, even though he used nothing verbatim from the text of any other Rocky script or recording. Surely the "how similar are the works?" test as part of determining infringement does not merely include verbatim text comparisons.
Mar
30
revised How can 'yield' be added as a keyword in ES6 if it wasn't a reserved word?
deleted 2 characters in body
Mar
30
revised How can 'yield' be added as a keyword in ES6 if it wasn't a reserved word?
added 496 characters in body
Mar
30
answered How can 'yield' be added as a keyword in ES6 if it wasn't a reserved word?
Mar
23
comment Open source License that doesn't require credit
@StephenC The OP has explicitly said that any requirement to preserve copyright notices runs afoul of the question's "must not require credit" requirement, so the GPL, BSD, and MIT are soundly out of bounds, as they all require the preservation of copyright notices. This answer lists licenses that do not require the preservation of copyright notices.
Mar
23
revised Will simply adding a 'Allow Cross Origin Requests' to my node app work?
added 389 characters in body
Mar
23
answered Will simply adding a 'Allow Cross Origin Requests' to my node app work?
Mar
23
comment Open source License that doesn't require credit
@konsolebox I don't fully understand your Sherlock Holmes example. I understand your requirements: other people can use your story text as long as they don't use your title, "Sherlock Holmes". Only you have the rights to the title, which you use to exclusively brand original stories. However what I don't understand is how that relates to author names (which aren't in your example). Your title example appears to related to the name of the software, not the names of the authors. Are you concerned about the author names or the software's name? They have different legal considerations.
Mar
23
comment Open source License that doesn't require credit
@konsolebox You seem to think copyright is the same thing as a copyright notice. They are not: copyright is a set of rights (and the ability to license a work depends upon those rights). Every line of copy is under the copyright of whoever wrote that line. You should edit your question to explain what you mean by "assuming copyright to the collection". Copyright rights are automatically, instantly assigned to the work's author when the work is fixed in a tangible medium. You can transfer your copyright, but it's something you can do exactly once, and then you don't have it any more.
Mar
20
revised Restrict cluster size with closed-source module in otherwise open-source program
edited title
Mar
12
awarded  Necromancer
Mar
9
comment Can someone relicense my code, then sue me for distributing it?
@user11177 Consider how your proposed "makes it theirs" argument sounds when applied to a non-code public domain work. A company takes an image of the Mona Lisa painting and sells copies for thousands of dollars under a proprietary license. Can they sue me for displaying a copy of the Mona Lisa that I got off Wikipedia? Can the company sue the Louvre museum for displaying the actual Mona Lisa? I'm no lawyer, but I surely hope the answer to these question is "no". (If you're concerned about the case where the company changes it, suppose their Mona Lisa has a mustache drawn on it.)