2,011 reputation
816
bio website linkedin.com/in/luisespinal
location Florida
age 44
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen Apr 4 at 18:00

Software Engineer and developer since 1994, knee deep in Java from 1998 till 2009, with experience in distributed systems, C/C++ (UNIX and Win32), CORBA, enterprise computing, software architecture, network protocols (layer 3 and up), systems administration, x86 Assembly, VB, FoxPro, and UML.

Working since 2010 with a defense contractor in the design and architecture of embedded systems using C/C++ and CORBA

I've pursued a MS in Computer Science (with focus on security in distributed systems). Now, I'm pursuing a MS in Electrical and Computer Engineering, and hopefully I would like to enter the fields of satellite communications and/or network protocols (layer 1 and 2). I might, at a later time pursue a Ph.D. in CS or CE (or a MS. in Computational Mathematics.)


Nov
14
revised How do you deal with changing requirements?
pretty formatting
Nov
8
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
12
awarded  Yearling
Aug
3
comment Why isn't Java used for modern web application development?
very-high-quality Java devs which are not easy to find - Indeed.
Jul
16
answered UML representation of type being passed as a parameter
May
15
comment Java or C++ for university CS courses?
And there is nothing hard core about C/C++ (or any language without garbage collection). It imbues upon the individual an understanding of resource consumption and management. I would probably say that 70% of my professional JEE time dealt with code written by people who had no clue about resource management. And I've seen this pattern so widespread that it is impossible NOT to infer a causality relation. Since the dot-com, we have lowered the bar, and we are plagued by sub-par developers. Lowering the bar to increase ranks, that is NOT something engineers and academia should be be proud of.
May
15
comment Java or C++ for university CS courses?
Java, by forcing you to learn programming in a noun-oriented, everything-as-object mode, it provides poor modeling metaphores for other paradigms that are more suitable for actual world modeling. A professional developer from the trenches can work around that limitation. Students do not, and forgive me, but very few college professors have from-the-trenches experience to know the distinction. I would pick Python or Ruby (or actually Lisp or BASIC) over Java if C/C++ is too hardcore.
May
15
comment Java or C++ for university CS courses?
Easier to understand and teach does not necessarily translate to being an adequate language for pedagogical purposes. After 12 years of working with Java, I'm convinced of this. A much better pedagogical language that is easier than C or C++ would be Python, for instance ... or any language that does not force every method to be in a class, that is, a language that is truly multi-paradigm as opposed to Java where everything is "supposedly" an object, where there are no good alternatives to scoping beyond classes and packages, and so on and so on. It limits the ability to teach proper modeling.
May
13
comment Java or C++ for university CS courses?
"C (or C++) VS Java - Java is way 'easier'" - well, that is a well-known given. I'm not sure what that has to do with my post, though (?????)
Feb
26
awarded  Constituent
Feb
26
awarded  Caucus
Feb
19
comment Stored Procedures a bad practice at one of worlds largest IT software consulting firms?
Yep and nay. That comment of mine was intended for this particular sentence referred by the OP in his original question (stored procedures are not a "best practice".) A coarse description of store procedures as best or bad practice is a generalization. Ignoring the context in which they can be good OR bad can (and will often lead) to screw ups when architecting or designing solutions ;)
Nov
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
8
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
12
awarded  Yearling
Aug
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
8
comment Is it wise to be going back and forth between two programming languages?
That is not a source. That's a link to a discussion (discussions are not, by themselves, sources), and it is one that is only focused on CSS and HTML. It doesn't address the "turing complete" test (I suggest you read Martin Fowler's work on the subject of DSLs), nor whether SQL is a programming language (which it is, here is an actual source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SQL, or this amazon.com/SQL-Programming-Language-Kirk-Scott/dp/0763766747). Either you are not reading my post fully, or you think a link to stackexchange is a source (which is not.)
Aug
8
answered Is it wise to be going back and forth between two programming languages?
Aug
8
comment Is it wise to be going back and forth between two programming languages?
Why would someone ask if knowing/using more than one thing is a detrimental practice (specially if said thing requires substantial intellectual effort)?
Aug
8
comment Is it wise to be going back and forth between two programming languages?
Anything that contains "Most people" or "most developers" should be followed with a citation of sorts. Otherwise, it is subjective. Almost every developer I've met (and myself included) considers SQL a programming language, and Turing completness is not a necessary factor for a programming language (think DSLs, which are typically designed to NOT be turing complete.) HTML and XML are obviously not programming languages (though you can have XML-based domain-specific languages). Regexs are not programming languages, but programmable/configurable automatons are.