2,011 reputation
816
bio website linkedin.com/in/luisespinal
location Florida
age 44
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen Apr 4 at 18:00

Software Engineer and developer since 1994, knee deep in Java from 1998 till 2009, with experience in distributed systems, C/C++ (UNIX and Win32), CORBA, enterprise computing, software architecture, network protocols (layer 3 and up), systems administration, x86 Assembly, VB, FoxPro, and UML.

Working since 2010 with a defense contractor in the design and architecture of embedded systems using C/C++ and CORBA

I've pursued a MS in Computer Science (with focus on security in distributed systems). Now, I'm pursuing a MS in Electrical and Computer Engineering, and hopefully I would like to enter the fields of satellite communications and/or network protocols (layer 1 and 2). I might, at a later time pursue a Ph.D. in CS or CE (or a MS. in Computational Mathematics.)


Oct
12
comment Is an architecture description document a violation of the DRY Principle?
That's a misunderstanding or blind application of DRY. An architectural description is not a violation of it. If one were to blindly apply DRY in this manner, then anything but the code is a violation of it... and clearly this was not the intention of those who came up with the the idea of it.
Oct
12
comment Is an architecture description document a violation of the DRY Principle?
Code never represents architecture. It is just a manifestation of the architecture. Code that was changed today might still represent the architecture of yesterday. Furthermore, it might not represent the intended (or contractually required) architecture, which is what you have to worry the most. Code doesn't tell you if it's right or wrong, only that it runs. To know if it is right or wrong, you have to look at the intended architecture and the requirements that drove the system to begin with.
Oct
12
comment Is an architecture description document a violation of the DRY Principle?
Do you actually believe you can discern the architecture by looking at the code? The code will tell you all the functional and nonfunctional requirements, the architectural trade-offs,deployment issues, business context, use case scenarios, etc, etc? If you code can TRULY tell you that, that's one hell of a trivial system.
Oct
12
answered How to be an agile programmer?
Oct
12
awarded  Autobiographer