2,133 reputation
916
bio website linkedin.com/in/luisespinal
location Florida
age 45
visits member for 4 years, 7 months
seen May 19 at 23:28

Software Engineer and developer since 1994, knee deep in Java from 1998 till 2009, with experience in distributed systems, C/C++ (UNIX and Win32), CORBA, enterprise computing, software architecture, network protocols (layer 3 and up), systems administration, x86 Assembly, VB, FoxPro, and UML.

Working since 2010 with a defense contractor in the design and architecture of embedded systems using C/C++ and CORBA

I've pursued a MS in Computer Science (with focus on security in distributed systems). Now, I'm pursuing a MS in Electrical and Computer Engineering, and hopefully I would like to enter the fields of satellite communications and/or network protocols (layer 1 and 2). I might, at a later time pursue a Ph.D. in CS or CE (or a MS. in Computational Mathematics.)


Apr
27
comment Why are websites (even this one) sometimes “Down for Maintenance”?
True. But then I'd argue that the problem isn't with formal verification of specifications, but with the validation of those specs. If your specs are invalid, then obviously everything will fall apart from there, but validation of specs ("are we really building the right thing needed by the intended user for the intended purpose"), that's not the focus of verification (*"given these specs, are we building this thing right, or can it be built?"), informal or otherwise. I guess I should have put a caveat on that (wrt to validity of the specs.)
Apr
26
answered Why are websites (even this one) sometimes “Down for Maintenance”?
Apr
22
answered Costs of Switching to Java
Apr
22
answered How do you ascertain the quality of a potential employer's code before you take a position?
Apr
22
answered Preparation for Ph.D
Apr
17
comment How does a programmer tell a business analyst that she isn't right?
@testerab - I understand what you are saying, but I think you are reading too much into that last sentence of mine, ignoring the context around it in my answer. it's not about reinforcing or workout out those behavioral anti-patterns. And being on the defensive is not mutually exclusive of building good relations. Not being able to build them has more to do with hidden a) agendas, anti-social behaviors and malice than b) being defensive/CYA - there is no necessary/sufficient causation on b from a. I suggest you re-read my post, my entire post, not just the last sentence.
Apr
16
comment How does a programmer tell a business analyst that she isn't right?
@testerag - con't. Moreover, I'm all for work synergy, but being unaware of the potential for conflict, that's just begging for pain. You want to be professional and team players at all times, but you must (for your own sanity) understand the behavioral anti-patterns that inevitably arise among silos (in particular between business analysts and developers, or developers and sysadmins and so forth.) The one suggested by the original poster is a textbook example of one.
Apr
16
comment How does a programmer tell a business analyst that she isn't right?
You can only control what you do, not what others do. Unfortunately, work will entail conflict at one point or another (read "CYOA"). In my experience, the insistence by the analyst in modifying a requirement has tended to be either malicious or at least mis-representative. And remember that the win/lose clause I put is at the very end of my suggestions (paragraphs 1 and 2), and an analysis of context (paragraph 3 and 4). If after all that, you still get to a win/lose situation (specially after explaining the process to the analyst), you get there only by malice or incompetence.
Apr
14
answered At what point do immutable classes become a burden?
Apr
13
comment What's the proper way to exit program in C?
There is no such thing as "which is the best". You code according to your "exit" requirements.
Apr
12
comment Would you still use Java in your next project, despite the whole mess in JCP
Quitting the JCP != quitting the platform.
Apr
12
comment Will Java still be relevant in 5 years?
As someone who has been working with Java since 1998 in application and systems development, while paying attention to the evolution of both Java (the programming language) and the JVM, I agree with this answer. If someone disagrees, I'd say either he doesn't work in Java much (which is ok) or he doesn't pay attention to the industry he's working on (which is bad.)
Apr
11
answered Is Information Technology really Engineering?
Apr
11
comment Off-shore bug fixing
@Dan - yep, your statement is far more correct. No such dichotomy exists.
Apr
11
answered Off-shore bug fixing
Apr
11
answered Career advice: PhD in theory of programming languages
Apr
7
revised Stored Procedures a bad practice at one of worlds largest IT software consulting firms?
added 261 characters in body
Apr
7
answered Stored Procedures a bad practice at one of worlds largest IT software consulting firms?
Apr
7
comment Stored Procedures a bad practice at one of worlds largest IT software consulting firms?
How do you version stored procedures on the server? - you version control the store proc source code. When it's time to deploy, you grab the store procs (from a given baseline) and you (or your dba) deploy to production. Redeployment (be it on testing or production) certainly blows out the stored exec plan, but that will happen independently of whether you source control your SPs or not.
Apr
7
comment Stored Procedures a bad practice at one of worlds largest IT software consulting firms?
@greyfade - "I have yet to see source control for SPs" - are you kidding me? A store proc is just a bloody text file that you upload in your database engine (which takes it, compiles it and installs it for execution.) Every place I've worked that has stored procs, we store the store proc source code in, say, CVS, clearcase or whichever SCM that was in use. Saying that store procs cannot be source-controlled (because they are in the db) is like saying my application source code (Java, C# or whatever) cannot be source controlled because it is compiled and deployed in production.