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Oct
6
comment What are the disadvantages of test-first programming?
That definition wouldn't work for me :) To me, any code that runs in production and that is subject of change is legacy code, independently of code or test quality. We typically associate "legacy code" with "bad code" or "obsolete code" when in reality bad code and obsolete code is already present in code under development that hasn't seen production usage yet. Our aim should be for our code to be legacy from the get go, and to be of such quality and usefulness that it remains in usage for years, decades to come.
Aug
3
comment Why isn't Java used for modern web application development?
very-high-quality Java devs which are not easy to find - Indeed.
May
15
comment Java or C++ for university CS courses?
And there is nothing hard core about C/C++ (or any language without garbage collection). It imbues upon the individual an understanding of resource consumption and management. I would probably say that 70% of my professional JEE time dealt with code written by people who had no clue about resource management. And I've seen this pattern so widespread that it is impossible NOT to infer a causality relation. Since the dot-com, we have lowered the bar, and we are plagued by sub-par developers. Lowering the bar to increase ranks, that is NOT something engineers and academia should be be proud of.
May
15
comment Java or C++ for university CS courses?
Java, by forcing you to learn programming in a noun-oriented, everything-as-object mode, it provides poor modeling metaphores for other paradigms that are more suitable for actual world modeling. A professional developer from the trenches can work around that limitation. Students do not, and forgive me, but very few college professors have from-the-trenches experience to know the distinction. I would pick Python or Ruby (or actually Lisp or BASIC) over Java if C/C++ is too hardcore.
May
15
comment Java or C++ for university CS courses?
Easier to understand and teach does not necessarily translate to being an adequate language for pedagogical purposes. After 12 years of working with Java, I'm convinced of this. A much better pedagogical language that is easier than C or C++ would be Python, for instance ... or any language that does not force every method to be in a class, that is, a language that is truly multi-paradigm as opposed to Java where everything is "supposedly" an object, where there are no good alternatives to scoping beyond classes and packages, and so on and so on. It limits the ability to teach proper modeling.
May
13
comment Java or C++ for university CS courses?
"C (or C++) VS Java - Java is way 'easier'" - well, that is a well-known given. I'm not sure what that has to do with my post, though (?????)
Feb
19
comment Stored Procedures a bad practice at one of worlds largest IT software consulting firms?
Yep and nay. That comment of mine was intended for this particular sentence referred by the OP in his original question (stored procedures are not a "best practice".) A coarse description of store procedures as best or bad practice is a generalization. Ignoring the context in which they can be good OR bad can (and will often lead) to screw ups when architecting or designing solutions ;)
Aug
8
comment Is it wise to be going back and forth between two programming languages?
That is not a source. That's a link to a discussion (discussions are not, by themselves, sources), and it is one that is only focused on CSS and HTML. It doesn't address the "turing complete" test (I suggest you read Martin Fowler's work on the subject of DSLs), nor whether SQL is a programming language (which it is, here is an actual source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SQL, or this amazon.com/SQL-Programming-Language-Kirk-Scott/dp/0763766747). Either you are not reading my post fully, or you think a link to stackexchange is a source (which is not.)
Aug
8
comment Is it wise to be going back and forth between two programming languages?
Why would someone ask if knowing/using more than one thing is a detrimental practice (specially if said thing requires substantial intellectual effort)?
Aug
8
comment Is it wise to be going back and forth between two programming languages?
Anything that contains "Most people" or "most developers" should be followed with a citation of sorts. Otherwise, it is subjective. Almost every developer I've met (and myself included) considers SQL a programming language, and Turing completness is not a necessary factor for a programming language (think DSLs, which are typically designed to NOT be turing complete.) HTML and XML are obviously not programming languages (though you can have XML-based domain-specific languages). Regexs are not programming languages, but programmable/configurable automatons are.
Jul
6
comment Why is it better for a programmer to design the algorithm before starting to write the code?
@SK-logic - you can't implement a program without any kind of algorithm, even in a high-level declarative programming language. However declarative, the declaration itself is a (high-level) algorith, with what-declarations that guide the compiler into choosing a how strategy. Get me this is itself a step that gets executed, ergo, an algorithm.
Jul
6
comment Why is it better for a programmer to design the algorithm before starting to write the code?
@Job - change jobs ;)
May
8
comment Stored Procedures a bad practice at one of worlds largest IT software consulting firms?
@ThorbjørnRavnAndersen - oh yeah, very typical in every place (good place that is) that I've worked that had stored procedures . The operative word is "good", a place that doesn't version SPs is a time-bomb IMO. I've worked mostly on Oracle shops, where we would use a command-line tool based off DBMS_METADATA or select text from user_source, or GUI-based extraction facilities off Toad or SQL Explorer.) Pretty much that's how things got versioned (and also, to create installs from scratch as you described.)
Apr
10
comment Is there a sequence to read through the Android developer site for a user new to Android?
@Paul - con't - personal annecdote for example, I typically rely on the Java development docs online (almost never on books) for Java and Scala development (same with C/POSIX using pubs.opengroup.org). But OTH I needed to get a book to work with JSTL because the online docs didn't cut the mustard. For Spring Framework, it's been a mix of books and online docs. *It woulbe (and will be) different for someone else. So it is a mix of personality types and technology documentation. This should not be surprising or unexpected.
Apr
10
comment Is there a sequence to read through the Android developer site for a user new to Android?
@Paul - your question is unanswerable in the general sense because almost everyone has different strategies for learning, in particular with software development. Some people will legitimately say that the site is as good as the book because, for them, it is. Are you really surprised by this? And do you actually think they should stop saying so? Not only it is specific to people, but it is specific to technology.
Apr
10
comment Is there a sequence to read through the Android developer site for a user new to Android?
spoon-fed? If that strategy works for you, more power. But I had a hard time vizualising that in the fast-paced development world (in particular in the uber-fast-paced mobile arena.) I don't think it'd work for me since, at least they way I've seen it, the only way to learn (but truly learn) is to be dropped into a real situation. If you try to build your knowledge in baby steps, that stuff will be obsolete by the time you want to use it. YMMV.
Mar
5
comment At what point do immutable classes become a burden?
@Mauricio - if you say so (that immutability in Java isn't that bad). Having worked on Java from 1998 till 2011, I'd beg to differ, it is not trivial exempt in simple code bases. However, people have different experiences, and I acknowledge that my POV is not free of subjectivity. So sorry, can't agree there. I do agree, however, with the ease of reasoning being the most important thing when it comes to immutability.
Oct
6
comment Are there any scientifically rigorous studies of coding style principles?
I suspect where the OP is coming from. He's clearly stating coding styles (not methodologies), and in particular, single vs multiple returns. I've had to cope with that a couple of times with well-written, inherently self-evident code using multiple return statements being rewrite into more convoluted versions using single-returns (in particular in large organizations big in red-tape) *as per "the process". And one wonders (and challenges with evidence) the validity, usability and cost-effectiveness of such arbitrary mandates. People who force such mandates still live in the 60's :/
Oct
6
comment Are there any scientifically rigorous studies of coding style principles?
from the OP's mouth Is a coding style principle - e.g. the single-exit principle - really a good thing? - that gives context to the question he's posing, about coding styles. Furthermore, coding style is not the same as programming methodology, in particular high-level design methods which are the focus of the IEEE article (clearly stated by the authors.) That's why I say "no" - the scopes are completely different.
Oct
6
comment Are there any scientifically rigorous studies of coding style principles?
Third article (thankfully I do have access to IEEE Xplore) doesn't seem related to what the OP is asking as far as I can tell. It is a wonderful article mind you, one which I'm printing for more dedicated reading at a later time. So maybe you could also have explained how this article helps the OP answer his question. Overall, it seems you simply threw a bunch of links together. It is not a manner of being dismissive (unless that was your intention), but again, I fail to see how that helped the OP. And this is why a poster should add some text along his links. So now you know why I said it ;)