1,804 reputation
920
bio website heroicsoftware.net
location New York, NY
age 34
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen Oct 16 '13 at 17:30

Freelance software engineer/developer/programmer in New York City. Focused on native iPhone app development, but I could probably make you a Mac app if you ask real nice.

Among other things, I'm responsible for

  • FatWatch, the best Hacker's Diet tool for iPhone,
  • MetroCost, a tool to save you money on public transit, and
  • Fingerpaintball, a brick breaking game designed for iPad.

My company is Heroic Software. I have a blog, a tumblelog, and I tweet.


Apr
3
answered Letting go of a project
Mar
22
revised Why was Tanenbaum wrong in the Tanenbaum-Torvalds debates?
added link to the debates
Mar
22
suggested suggested edit on Why was Tanenbaum wrong in the Tanenbaum-Torvalds debates?
Feb
21
comment (Why) Should I learn a new programming language?
In an ideal world, there would only be one answer to Nupal's question. Having all of these additional answers after the first one by people who don't understand the virtues of standardization just causes confusion. There's nothing wrong with disagreeing with the answer in your own mind, but posting an additional answer makes you part of the problem.
Nov
2
awarded  Civic Duty
Oct
13
asked You write the server, I write the client: Best practices for designing an API?
Oct
12
awarded  Yearling
Aug
30
answered How important are PHP notices really?
Aug
29
comment What do you think of opening brace comments in source code?
Well, I was just being snarky: if I saw that an author took the time to write a comment that merely declared the code to be self-documenting, I'd be somewhat annoyed. (In the context of your answer, there's nothing wrong with it.)
Aug
29
comment What do you think of opening brace comments in source code?
I hope people don't take away that // self-commenting is something that should appear in their code. :-)
Aug
29
comment What is the most orthogonal programming language?
In math edu (where I have a tiny amount of experience), "Learning without Understanding" is a big problem: a focus on how to do it without why. My claim is that if you teach the concepts of programming, a toy language will do fine, and if you succeed, the transfer to a "real" language won't be hard. (If transfer is hard, you taught procedures, not concepts.) A toy environment doesn't prevent people from learning, but it does requires good lesson planning to be engaging. (I like this thread but I think we've crossed over into discussion territory and the moderators will be displeased.)
Aug
29
comment What is the most orthogonal programming language?
I get your point. We just disagree. I think the transfer is important, it requires that the student has a deeper understanding than one who has a successful guessing strategy (e.g., one who "solves" word problems by picking out numbers and plugging them into the formulas in the beginning of the chapter). In other words, if they can't transfer what they learned, they never learned it in the first place. To keep students motivated, you just have to choose the right problems, which is important regardless of language, "real" or "toy".
Aug
26
comment What is the most orthogonal programming language?
Right, I think we differ on what "do a little bit" means. If you want to (for example) appease the "show me how to make video games" contingent, you can do some things, but they will get to a point because they can't make progress and get frustrated, and then you have to go back to the "boring parts" so they can gain the understanding to move forward. At this point, they are already frustrated in a bad way and may just give up; on the other hand, doing the "boring parts" first and building upwards means continual progress. But obviously you don't start with a strip of semi-infinite tape.
Aug
26
revised What is the most orthogonal programming language?
more of explanation of the benefits of Logo
Aug
26
comment What is the most orthogonal programming language?
I agree that students should be able to experiment, but requiring understanding before you can "do anything" seems like the whole point of teaching.
Aug
26
comment What is the most orthogonal programming language?
It is a fallacy to claim that teaching a "real" language is the way to provide real-world relevance. It is the teacher's job to show how the "toy" language relates to real-world skills. Learning to juggle by starting with knives does not mean you are learning more relevant juggling skills.
Aug
25
answered What is the most orthogonal programming language?
Aug
25
comment What is the most orthogonal programming language?
Yes! The fact that Scheme is radically different from most "real" languages lets you focus on programming and not on APIs. Learning Scheme is like the "wax on, wax off" of coding; seems like a waste of time until you realize you have a deeper understanding of the computer than before.
Aug
25
comment What is the most orthogonal programming language?
While Python and Ruby spare you from managing memory, I'm not so sure that the languages themselves are simpler.
Aug
23
comment How do I make up for a lack of feedback as a solo developer?
Can you recommend how to find a good IRC channel?