373 reputation
211
bio website nathantresch.com
location Seattle, WA
age 41
visits member for 2 years, 2 months
seen Jun 18 at 20:14

I’m a 39 year old autodidact, and very proud to be. I'm looking for work right now, but that's normal given my proclivity for accepting contracts. I write, I eat, and I enjoy life with all of the gusto I can. I love language and languages. I occasionally slip and use serial commas, and when I do I often leave them as a flag flying in the face of my enemy, Language Prescriptivism. I’m a native English speaker and I’ve studied both Latin and several Romance Languages that are derived from it. I’ve studied law, language, history, sociology, logic, debate, math and various sciences, because those subjects all fascinate me to no end.

Care to learn more? Visit my blog! <3


Oct
17
awarded  Notable Question
Jun
25
comment Is node.js a suitable server platform for financial applications?
@Simon Right, and JS has tons of classes that extend numerical functions, so, if pointing out that NumPy extends the language counts, so do all of the JS classes. I really have no idea what jhsowter is talking about is the point I'm trying to make, JS has plenty of types of numbers, unless you're talking about primitives, in which case JS is the same as both Python and PHP, supporting a limited number of primitives.
Jun
13
awarded  Popular Question
May
10
awarded  Critic
May
10
comment Who does test-driven development?
Doesn't this question encourage list style answers with no real criteria as to when it's been answered "correctly"? Aren't these kinds of questions deemed unfit for StackExchange's Q&A format because we end up with 16+ answers, each of which addresses the question however none of which meet the non-existant exit criterea for "correct"?
May
10
comment Who does test-driven development?
I downvoted because I am left with no idea about who does T.D.D., no idea about what kinds of organisations might benefit from T.D.D., or why it might help any development cycle iteration. There are specific places where T.D.D. isn't appropriate, as demonstrated in the more substantial answers below, and I imagine that the converse of the situations mentioned exist and would like to know more about them.
Apr
19
awarded  Yearling
Jan
31
comment Best development model for novice game developers
This is a list answer question and as such is generally considered unacceptable for our Q&A format.
Jan
31
answered MVC - Isolating view and model logic
Jan
31
revised What *are* the programming concepts I should master to have a deep understanding of my craft (programming)?
added 188 characters in body
Jan
31
comment How does C++ handle multiple inheritance with a shared common ancestor?
@DocBrown Yes, namespace collisions are non-deterministic. I believe that name mangling attempts to mitigate it, but it still happens. Proper testing and pattern implimentation makes this a I non-issue, as well as certain templates. I have adjusted my answer.
Jan
31
revised How does C++ handle multiple inheritance with a shared common ancestor?
added 522 characters in body
Jan
31
comment How does C++ handle multiple inheritance with a shared common ancestor?
I was a permatemp, aka microserf for years.
Jan
30
comment How does C++ handle multiple inheritance with a shared common ancestor?
It's one of the reasons, and I didn't mean to imply that it doesn't ever work. When something is non-deterministic in computing I tend to say it's "broken", or that it "doesn't work" when I intend to mean "it's like voodoo, it may or may not work, light your candles and pray." :D
Jan
30
comment How does C++ handle multiple inheritance with a shared common ancestor?
@DocBrown As to your assertion that it works in C++, you're mistaken. Namespace collision is a real issue. Name magling mitigtates that, I'm given to understand, but it's not 100%.
Jan
30
comment How does C++ handle multiple inheritance with a shared common ancestor?
+1 for a much more complete answer than mine.
Jan
30
comment How does C++ handle multiple inheritance with a shared common ancestor?
@DocBrown I worked at MS on the Visual Studio team and I assure you that's at least in part the reason they developed delegation and interfaces, to avoid namespace collision altogether. As to the quality of the question, meh. Use your downvote, others seem to think that it's useful.
Jan
30
answered How does C++ handle multiple inheritance with a shared common ancestor?
Jan
30
comment About clean code
+1 because your answer obviously has more effort put into it than mine.
Jan
30
comment About clean code
@resting Keep asking, your question is perfectly reasonable and I hope I was able to help you and anyone else facing this kind of a decision.