1,126 reputation
419
bio website janosgyerik.com
location Paris, France
age 36
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen 1 hour ago

I like to code and I do it a lot. I want to build software to save the planet. Passionate polyglot programmer, generalist with specialties. Code reviewer, unit tester, driver of change. I get things done.

I make free Android apps such as Programming Quiz, websites such as bashoneliners.com, and other open source stuff. I wrote a book on Bazaar Version Control, and an article on shell tips & tricks for Linux Journal.

I blog, tweet (@janosgyerik), and post "pro tips" on CoderWall.

Careers 2.0: http://careers.stackoverflow.com/janosgyerik

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/janosgyerik


20h
comment What kind of user info is ok to be stored as plain text in SQL Database?
Thanks @MichaelT, great tip, added to my post!
20h
revised What kind of user info is ok to be stored as plain text in SQL Database?
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1d
answered What kind of user info is ok to be stored as plain text in SQL Database?
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awarded  Vox Populi
Dec
23
awarded  Suffrage
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23
awarded  Investor
Dec
21
comment Query on java I/O BufferedOutputStream write() method
It's the job of the stream reader to make those kind of things transparent for you. You don't have to worry about it. You can count that it will read data in chunks, and as you read more, it will read more.
Dec
21
comment Query on java I/O BufferedOutputStream write() method
The difference is in what's happening underneath. In the 2nd example, even when you call read(), it will not actually read from the stream byte by byte, but get the next byte from the buffer it has already read. So you can expect the second solution to be faster.
Dec
21
comment Query on java I/O BufferedOutputStream write() method
Either use the other read(...) method that takes a byte[] buffer as parameter, and pass that buffer to the writer.
Dec
21
answered Query on java I/O BufferedOutputStream write() method
Nov
30
answered Should I accept empty collections in my methods that iterate over them?
Aug
11
comment Is splitting up a function into several inner functions an anti-pattern?
@user1068 the answer doesn't say "always" anywhere. The primary questions in the OP are: "Is this an anti-pattern of some sort? Or is this a reasonable way to split up long functions?" and I answered NO and YES, and this much should be pretty clear.
Aug
11
awarded  Good Answer
Aug
11
awarded  Mortarboard
Aug
11
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
11
revised Is splitting up a function into several inner functions an anti-pattern?
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Aug
11
answered Is splitting up a function into several inner functions an anti-pattern?
Aug
11
revised Quickly compute added and removed lines
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Aug
11
revised How to log configuration or code behaviour changes in non-disruptive way
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Aug
11
answered What should be done on git while migrating new distribution and packet manager?