245 reputation
19
bio website about.me/rsenna
location Porto Alegre, Brazil
age 40
visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen Nov 23 at 2:24

A programmer from Brazil.
Used to work with C#. And with Delphi, C++ and C before that.
Recently abducted by the Scala/Lift front.
Knows some stuff about design patterns, database tuning, SQL, JavaScript, Python, Ruby, occidental contemporary pop music and what not.


Jan
19
revised Is Moore's law (empirically) the same for both memory capacity and processing speed?
edited tags
Jan
19
comment Is Moore's law (empirically) the same for both memory capacity and processing speed?
@Mike Brown: thanks for your answer. Regarding my "hypothesis" about functional languages vs. memory consumption, this is due to the intensive use of immutable data structures - this would surely avoid lock and standard concurrency, but I guess it also translates in more memory usage.
Jan
19
awarded  Student
Jan
19
asked Is Moore's law (empirically) the same for both memory capacity and processing speed?
Dec
20
awarded  Commentator
Dec
20
comment Is there still a need for writing SQL?
@Mr. CRT: Hm, you mean those "applications" that doesn't need any kind of user interface whatsoever, and that could even be completely written using some sort of SQL extension language (like PL/SQL or TSQL)? OK, fair enough. In fact, I'll let you keep even the BI and data mining applications; I guess an ORM would not matter that much there too... But I still think that, for any other kind of transactional application with a real end-user interface, an ORM tool would not only speed development and maintenance, but also improve overall performance.
Dec
17
awarded  Teacher
Dec
17
awarded  Editor
Dec
17
comment Is there still a need for writing SQL?
@Mr. CRT: my lack of understanding would be easily solved by simply giving an example! ;-)
Dec
17
comment Is there still a need for writing SQL?
Mr. CRT: hurts performance?!? OK, I surely can imagine such a situation - but I have never found it on real world scenarios. An optimized, ORM based application has, most of the time, better performance precisely because of first and second level caching... The DBMS is the main bottleneck for almost every kind of application (I work with web internet development btw), and to be able to avoid querying it is definitely a good thing! Besides that, yes, I can have the benefits of ORM without an ORM - but what's the point? Just stubbornly reinventing the wheel?!
Dec
17
comment Does ORM promote database de-normalisation?
And many ORMs are capable of multi-table inheritance: (N)Hibernate and RoR ActiveRecord do, for instance.
Dec
17
comment Is there still a need for writing SQL?
Leaky abstractions aside, people here seem to forget that most ORMs have many advantages over plain SQL queries: first and second level cache, lazy loading (with eager loading being an option in order to avoid the N + 1 issue) and being able to unit-test the data access layer (by switching the DBMS for a in-memory database), just to name a few...
Dec
17
awarded  Supporter
Dec
15
answered Is there still a need for writing SQL?