944 reputation
714
bio website google.com/+DanielPryden
location Silicon Valley
age 31
visits member for 4 years, 7 months
seen 2 days ago

I started tinkering with computers at the age of 6. These days, I'm a senior software engineer at Google, currently working on Java application server infrastructure.

Besides being fluent in English and American Sign Language, I know too many programming languages to count. Lately I've primarily been using Java, plus some odds and ends of Python, C++, and JavaScript. I enjoy C#, even though nowadays I don't get many chances to use it. I'm also a big fan of Haskell and Scala, although I haven't had a chance to use either of them in a large-scale project yet.

In my spare time, I play guitar and read voraciously, including science fiction and books on computing. I'm also a volunteer minister for the deaf, teaching Bible studies in American Sign Language.

Standard disclaimer: my opinions are my own, and not necessarily those of my employer.


May
21
answered Why is Invariance, Covariance and Contravariance necessary in typed languages
May
11
awarded  Yearling
May
10
answered Working machines of developers - in what ways are they usually standardized or restricted?
Mar
24
comment What makes C so popular in the age of OOP?
@DeadMG: Pot, meet kettle. TIOBE's data may not be reliable, but your bald assertion that "it's not popular" has no source or citation whatsoever. If you're going to challenge the assumption behind the question, at least provide some evidence to back it up.
Mar
24
comment What makes C so popular in the age of OOP?
@KonstantinSolomatov: If you are writing a library that will be consumed by other people, please do the world a favor and write it in C instead of C++. If you can't do that, at least write a C API. Everything in the universe can link to C code in some way or another, usually with minimal effort. By contrast, you will frequently have major ABI issues when trying to call C++ code from other C++ code, let alone from other languages.
Feb
23
answered Examples of operator overloading, which make sense
Feb
9
comment Why are shortcuts like x += y considered good practice?
+1 for a simple Python example.
Feb
7
awarded  Editor
Feb
7
revised Regulation of the software industry
Fixed broken link
Feb
7
suggested approved edit on Regulation of the software industry
Nov
10
comment Why are people so strongly opposed to #region tags in methods?
Not really an answer, but not only do I hate all #region tags, I turn off code folding in Visual Studio altogether. I don't like code that tries to hide from me.
Nov
8
comment Should a programmer fix someone else's failed build?
@KeithS: True. But I've found that, regardless of when I leave, the most likely time for me to break the build is when I'm in a hurry: right before lunch, right before a meeting, right before the end of the day. So I think it's a "personal best practice" to not commit anything when there isn't enough time to watch and fix the build afterward.
Oct
24
comment What exactly is a programming language? What enables us to write in such a language?
+1 for mentioning "Code". That book should be required reading for every entry-level CS student.
Oct
16
comment Is it wrong or bad to use autocomplete?
Good points, but seriously: you can't remember how to add an item to a List? That's not an "obscure" API, it's one of the most commonly used interfaces in the standard library.
Oct
12
comment Is Systems Hungarian notation still a useful practice?
+1 for pointing out that the real argument here is about type theory. Hungarian notation is a technique for augmenting the type system with additional information, and as such should be compared and contrasted with other techniques for augmenting the type system (e.g. templates, typedef, etc.), rather than being discussed on its aesthetic merits (or lack thereof).
Oct
9
answered Why do languages such as C and C++ not have garbage collection, while Java does?
Oct
6
comment Are these signs of a bad developer?
+1 for the iceberg secret.
Sep
24
answered Database source control
Sep
6
comment Do the young minds need to learn the pointer concepts?
@Joe Internet: Correct, except that C# calls its pointer-enabled blocks "unsafe" blocks, not "unmanaged". You can use an unsafe block to manipulate unmanaged resources, but they are not the same thing.
Aug
30
comment Are compilers used outside of development?
@Jan Soltis: I am aware that that is your opinion. I respectfully disagree. I provided counterarguments to support my position, while you continue to make unsupported assertions. You seem to think that there is a sharp line between "developer" and "end user" which I do not believe exists.