893 reputation
713
bio website google.com/+DanielPryden
location Silicon Valley
age 31
visits member for 4 years
seen 9 hours ago

I started tinkering with computers at the age of 6. These days, I'm a senior software engineer at Google, currently working on Java application server infrastructure.

Besides being fluent in English and American Sign Language, I know too many programming languages to count. Lately I've primarily been using Java, plus some odds and ends of Python, C++, and JavaScript. I enjoy C#, even though nowadays I don't get many chances to use it. I'm also a big fan of Haskell and Scala, although I haven't had a chance to use either of them in a large-scale project yet.

In my spare time, I play guitar and read voraciously, including science fiction and books on computing. I'm also a volunteer minister for the deaf, teaching Bible studies in American Sign Language.

Standard disclaimer: my opinions are my own, and not necessarily those of my employer.


Aug
15
answered At What Point Should You Start To Think About Performance?
Aug
15
comment What causes floating point rounding errors?
To be precise, it's not really the error caused by rounding that most people worry about -- it's the fact that binary floating-point rounding behaves in unintuitive ways. Switching to a decimal representation can make the rounding behave in a more intuitive way, but in exchange you will nearly always increase the relative error (or else have to increase the storage space to compensate).
Jul
7
comment How could RDBMSes be considered a fad?
@vartec: OK, I retract my downvote. (I can't actually remove it unless the post is edited.) I do think it would be best to clarify that there are solutions that don't involve OO. And yes, I agree that an ORM is worse even than an OODBMS.
Jul
7
awarded  Commentator
Jul
7
comment Why don't relational databases support returning information in a nested format?
@Precious: There doesn't have to be any increased overhead for running multiple queries. Most databases allow you to submit multiple queries in a single batch and receive multiple result sets from a single query.
Jul
7
comment How could RDBMSes be considered a fad?
@Carson: My apologies, but that's not how I read the answer. @vartec says: "The true solution is the OODBMS (which didn't get much traction unfortunately)." I respectfully disagree: I would say the true solution is to understand the relational model and use it effectively. OODBMS is a poor man's solution for when you must use OO principles for your data model, which certainly isn't a universal case.
Jul
6
comment How could RDBMSes be considered a fad?
-1 because you imply that the relational model is a "problem" that needs a solution. True, if you are committed to modeling your software on the object-oriented paradigm, then you will have an impedance mismatch. But that doesn't imply that there's anything wrong with the relational model -- OO is not the only game in town, nor even necessarily the best paradigm for every project.
Jun
24
comment Can I use the test suite from an open source project to verify that my own 'compatible library' is compatible?
+1 for "Similarly, you can use emacs to develop proprietary software."
Jun
7
awarded  Suffrage
Jun
4
awarded  Civic Duty
Jun
4
comment Do I really need oop for my kind of job? After 10 years I think I don't
+1 for the link about eating corn. I hadn't seen that before, and it's eerily accurate in my case!
May
3
comment What's the most absurd myth about programming issues?
@configurator: Actually, Sun's implementation of Java 6 is co-bundled with the Mozilla Rhino JavaScript engine. So modern Java does come with JavaScript, but just like the Carpets in your Car, it's an often-overlooked detail.
Apr
27
awarded  Critic
Mar
8
awarded  Teacher
Mar
8
answered Why aren't we all doing model driven development yet?
Oct
26
awarded  Supporter
Oct
15
awarded  Autobiographer
May
27
comment What is the history of the use of “foo” and “bar” in source code examples?
Just a note that there's strong evidence (see RFC 3092, the Jargon File, and other answers here) that "foo" was used as a placeholder nonsense word in the 1930s, well before FUBAR came into military slang in the WWII era.
May
27
comment What is the history of the use of “foo” and “bar” in source code examples?
@Jim Ferrans: While FUBAR probably influenced the use of "bar" with "foo", there is strong evidence that "foo" by itself well predates WWII, with references at least back to the 1930s, as your comment indicates. It might be good to mention that in the body of your answer.
May
27
comment What is the history of the use of “foo” and “bar” in source code examples?
@Jonathan Fingland: No it doesn't. (In fact, "foo" probably predates both "foobar" and "FUBAR".) See RFC 3092 and the Jargon File entry for "foo".