1,868 reputation
311
bio website twitter.com/jeunice
location Nashua, NH
age 49
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen 4 hours ago

Full-stack developer, DevOps/cloud service operator, IT strategic advisor, smokejumper

I'm often called in "OMG! Everything is on fire! HALP!!!" situations. I'm especially good at complex integration and automation tasks.

I've programmed inside the Unix kernel and multi-threaded middleware, but my own development projects tend to be up-stack, using Python, Flask, JavaScript, jQuery, d3.js, HTML, CSS, and LESS most heavily at present. Also have worked heavily with Perl, PHP, WordPress, Java, SQL, MySQL, XML, JSON, Open Document Format, and a buncha other stuff. I am interested in, but have not heavily used, Ruby, Go, Julia, Rust, D, Nimrod, and a few others. Or I can get into the wayback machine and do C, bash, awk, Ada, Pascal, Modula-2, Icon, LISP, Prolog, and Smalltalk, depending how far back you want to go. Let's just pretend that BASIC thing never happened, s'ok?

Look for me on BitBucket, Github, and stackoverflow. For those seeking a mentor, I'm available!


5h
answered How-To: a browser based, real time, shared memory inspection/debugger application
5h
answered Efficient database access for related data
6h
answered Moving old desktop application to a robust platform
7h
comment Why are floating point numbers used often in Science/Engineering?
@luk32 We violently agree about most of those points. One can model some thing exactly (volume of a sphere, e.g.), but can never measure exactly. And reality never perfectly fits a perfect model. Better to get slightly imprecise, useful values/models than wait for perfect measurements or computations--something that will always be one step away.
7h
answered Application qos involving priority and bandwidth
10h
comment Why are floating point numbers used often in Science/Engineering?
Good answer. While the underlying functions may be perfectly continuous, which would require perfect precision to exactly model, the reality is that everything in science and engineering is an approximation. We'd rather have decent, useful approximations and accomplish something than infinite precision, for which we'd wait forever for many operations to complete.
14h
revised How to pick a platform for a new application
deleted extraneous word left over from original composition
1d
comment How to pick a platform for a new application
@user1582878 For me, app packaging and installation is the hard part. That's true for any locally installed app though (incl GUI). The setup is under a few dozen lines of Python. But, you do have to have skills across your server and client environments.
1d
answered How to pick a platform for a new application
1d
revised What to do if a feature is not supported natively on a platform?
removed adverbial forms for parallel construction
1d
answered What to do if a feature is not supported natively on a platform?
1d
answered What's the difference between robustness and fault-tolerance?
Oct
17
revised Should I put the name of the method I'm testing in the Unit Test method's name/assert message?
ADDed tagS
Oct
17
suggested suggested edit on Should I put the name of the method I'm testing in the Unit Test method's name/assert message?
Oct
17
comment Should I put the name of the method I'm testing in the Unit Test method's name/assert message?
Additional point: You probably don't need the error message in the assertion. Many consider that an anti-pattern / worst practice. If the assertion fails, any developer looking at the code will quickly see why. Don't waste your time crafting error messages for tests when the failing condition will quickly be apparent.
Oct
17
answered Should I put the name of the method I'm testing in the Unit Test method's name/assert message?
Oct
17
comment In an Agile Environment, who is responsible for software architecture
@Giorgio Sorry, but the answer is highly variable and depends entirely on who you ask. It is a matter of opinion on which there appears to be no broad consensus. I believe that the architecture of complex projects/deliverables cannot simply be parceled out amongst most teams. But many Agile proponents would strongly disagree. YMMV.
Oct
16
comment In an Agile Environment, who is responsible for software architecture
@Giorgio That's a big question, and one about which practitioners have strong feelings pro or con. Let Google be your friend in reading about them. (Update: "scrum at scale" is another useful term to search on / entrant in this race).
Oct
16
comment In an Agile Environment, who is responsible for software architecture
@Giorgio Agile often radically rethinks/restructures traditional project roles, often favoring bottoms-up, programmer-led approaches to everything. Perhaps some baby is discarded with the bath water. Which is probably why the pendulum is now swinging somewhat back towards "enterprise agile" or "scaled agile" in some shops.
Oct
16
comment In an Agile Environment, who is responsible for software architecture
Pure Agile tends to reject traditional top-down roles like "project manager" and "system architect," instead preferring to refactor those roles and distribute their traditional responsibilities throughout the team.