1,397 reputation
39
bio website twitter.com/jeunice
location Nashua, NH
age 49
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen 5 hours ago

Full-stack developer, DevOps/cloud service operator, IT strategic advisor, smokejumper

I'm often called in "OMG! Everything is on fire! HALP!!!" situations. I'm especially good at complex integration and automation tasks.

I've programmed inside the Unix kernel and multi-threaded middleware, but my own development projects tend to be up-stack, using Python, Flask, JavaScript, jQuery, d3.js, HTML, CSS, and LESS most heavily at present. Also have worked heavily with Perl, PHP, WordPress, Java, SQL, MySQL, XML, JSON, Open Document Format, and a buncha other stuff. I am interested in, but have not heavily used, Ruby, Go, Julia, Rust, D, Nimrod, and a few others. Or I can get into the wayback machine and do C, bash, awk, Ada, Pascal, Modula-2, Icon, LISP, Prolog, and Smalltalk, depending how far back you want to go. Let's just pretend that BASIC thing never happened, s'ok?

Look for me on BitBucket, Github, and stackoverflow. For those seeking a mentor, I'm available!


Sep
25
comment What is the most robust, extensible way to represent a contract in code?
Moreover, they have a defined environment in which conflicts or ambiguities can be resolved, and that serves to enforce the contracts: the court system.
Sep
25
comment Is it okay to use exceptions as tools to “catch” errors early?
I've done performance-sensitive work in the numerical/HPC and OS/middleware realms. A 13% performance bump is no small thing. I might turn off some checks to get it, in the same way a military commander might ask for 105% of nominal reactor output. But I've seen "it will run faster this way" given often as a reason to turn off checks, backups, and other protections. It's basically trading off resiliency and safety (in many cases, including data integrity) for extra performance. Whether that's worthwhile is a judgment call.
Sep
25
comment Is it okay to use exceptions as tools to “catch” errors early?
I admit that merely rebranding a common exception to a private label of basically the same exception is a weak example, and rarely worth the effort. In practice I try to emit custom exceptions at a higher semantic level, more intimately tied to the intent of the module.
Sep
23
revised Is it okay to use exceptions as tools to “catch” errors early?
removed excess "s"
Sep
15
answered Is it okay to use exceptions as tools to “catch” errors early?
Sep
12
comment How should I “dig deeper” as a web developer?
Granted, defensive driving (e.g. RAII) helps prevent errors. And languages do evolve. Modern versions of Ada, COBOL, Fortran, Pascal, and RPG now all have added object-orientation, e.g. If you're already using them, such extensions are great. But I wouldn't usually recommend them for new users any more than I'd recommend C, Objective-C, and C++. YMMV.
Sep
12
answered Is 'lazy' the correct term for timestamp-based skipping?
Sep
12
comment How should I “dig deeper” as a web developer?
@Shautieh You raise a fair point. While the primary group are much "closer to the metal," statically typed, and compile to machine code, they do tend to be memory-managed. Finding a strictly non-memory managed language these days is hard, since "manage your own memory" is such a proven quagmire. D, Go, or Rust can be quite low-level. I'd have to have a very specific reason to recommend 1970s and 1980s designs like C or C++ to someone working from the perspective of a web programmer.
Sep
11
answered How should I “dig deeper” as a web developer?
Sep
10
comment Is it ever OK for a conditional to have side effects?
A nit: A single pipe (vertical bar) is a bitwise-or in most languages, rather than a logical "or." It does not short-circuit if the left hand side is true. Since this conditional has side effects on the right side, it makes an especially big difference in the outcome.
Sep
10
answered One boilerplate class or many similar classes?
Sep
10
comment Should an object query its owner?
The computation of busStopMatrix in the first code example seems pointless, as it not stored in the World instance.
Sep
10
answered Simple unicode application?
Sep
9
revised Efficient “Object with weights” structure
clarified statement about how object ids are used
Sep
9
revised Efficient “Object with weights” structure
naming error
Sep
9
revised Efficient “Object with weights” structure
fixed unnecessary inheritance
Sep
8
answered Efficient “Object with weights” structure
Sep
6
comment Do else blocks increase code complexity?
Now, you will argue that one should decompose complex functionality into multiple functions. You'll be right. But at some point when parsing those deeply nested structures, you'll have a lot of if/then/elif/else checks--and unless you're willing to have dozens of functions and believe "every computing problem can be solved with just one more level of indirection," some function is going to have to do some heavy lifting--and then you'll have sequential guards and tests, and rightward drift.
Sep
6
comment Do else blocks increase code complexity?
@WinstonEwert I doubt you're going to agree with me under any circumstances! But if you want a specific example, try "cleaning up" footnotes in ODT (OpenDocument Text) documents. Find each footnote citation <text:note-body>. If it has text descendants, and the first of those starts with whitespace, left-trim that whitespace. Do the same with the rightmost text descendant, if any. Additionally, if any of the descendants are <text:span> that reference trivial/idempotent styles, unwrap just the trivial spans. When you're done, I'll happily send you test cases.
Sep
6
revised Do else blocks increase code complexity?
better wording