Reputation
1,316
Top tag
Next privilege 2,000 Rep.
Edit questions and answers
Badges
6 13
Newest
 Good Answer
Impact
~39k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 2 helpful flags
  • 244 votes cast
Aug
24
comment How to handle “can you add just a few more fields” type of requests from customers?
@Wayne M thanks for demonstrating the attitude I was referring to. The customers may not understand technology, but they usually are not idiots. It's usually the developer that doesn't understand the business need. Moreover, if adding a feature compromises the integrity of the application, that's a sign of poor application design.
Aug
24
comment How to handle “can you add just a few more fields” type of requests from customers?
There is a poor trend in software development for developers to not want to do what the customer wants, because it isn't cool or fun. We developers tend to put our own happiness before the wants of the customer almost universally. However, its not about our fun and enjoyment. Its about the customer. The customer is the one who pays the bills, you'd better make them happy. If you are in the business of writing customizable software, this is part of the job.
Aug
17
comment How does EF 4.1 stack up against ADO.NET SQL for stored procedures?
I don't really think the size of the project has that much effect on my decision. However, I'm probably more likely to use an ORM on a large project than a small one. If you are asking about specific ORMs, there's a ton of them out there. They all have their positives and negatives; it's a matter of personal choice. I would probably still choose EF simply because it's included out-of-the-box with .Net4.
Aug
17
comment How does EF 4.1 stack up against ADO.NET SQL for stored procedures?
@AndyBursh - I do not understand your comment. If the environment was not .Net4, I'd have to change because I couldn't use EF4.
Jul
28
comment Why does Microsoft charge a fortune for its developer tools?
Have you actually compared the tools you listed with Visual Studio? There isn't a comparison. Visual Studio is orders of magnitude better than any of those. Visual Studio is, bar none, the best integrated development environment in existence.
Jun
10
comment Who is responsible for defects found during development?
Anyone know what the question is?
Apr
25
comment Why aren't all programs being turned into web apps?
+1 @DeveloperArt I totally brain farted about the statelessness. :)
Apr
25
comment Why aren't all programs being turned into web apps?
I find that, in general, the problem domains in most web apps tend to be much simpler than other apps, but the implementation tends to me far more complex. Any web app nowadays requires the dev to know a myriad of languages: html, xml, json, javascript, php/ruby/java/c#, and sql; as well as a zillion different browser quirks, and multipe frameworks. On the other hand, other types of dev domains tend to be far more complicated, yet require the dev to know fewer technologies; like C#/Sql or Java/Oracle. Occasionally, these overlap, but not often.
Apr
22
comment How do I get people to contribute ideas for my .NET library?
You could start by linking to your project in this post. People might find it interesting and want to help out.
Apr
21
comment Returning from a long function on the first false condition
@Frustrated - I'm aware of that. I am firmly against that philosophy. A single exit point almost always clutters the code, IMO. Unfortunately, my hastily thrown together example doesn't illustrate the benefit of multiple returns.
Apr
21
comment Returning from a long function on the first false condition
@Frits - Good catch. That's what you get when you throw together code with no forethought. :)
Apr
14
comment How can I get programmers to stop writing code vulnerable to SQL injection?
@Roger - it's only minor until you get hacked. :) I think that putting code into production without a review (no matter the level of the developer) is a failure. Unfortunately, it is a very common practice in a lot of companies; and, ime, it usually takes a major oh-$4!t before management starts to value things like code reviews.
Mar
21
comment Avoid Postfix Increment Operator
I haven't checked this in years, but in MS Visual C++ 6, the compiler was smart enought to always generate the exact same assembly for ++i and i++ if they were used on a single line or in a for loop. So there was absolutely no performance lost for using post-fix.
Mar
17
comment How to hire a web-programmer : for non-programmer
I think you need to clarify your question. Are you a non-programmer attempting to hir a web-programmer? Also, I think you need to clarify what you mean by 'true "live" website requirements.'
Mar
16
comment If you need more than 3 levels of indentation, you're screwed?
What they are warning against is the usage of the Arrowhead Anti-pattern. A full description can be found here: lostechies.com/blogs/chrismissal/archive/2009/05/27/…
Feb
24
comment Harmful temptations in programming
This is called Rapid Application Development; and it never works in a business environment. :)
Nov
2
comment Why is OOP difficult?
@Konrad - I agree that on a higher level, the recipe metaphor breaks down. However, in my experience of training and hiring, the vast majority of professional programmers never make it past the recipe stage.
Nov
1
comment Why is OOP difficult?
@Jeff O - I disagree. Programming only requires the ability to tell someone how to do something in a step-by-step manner. If you can tell someone how to make a peanut butter & jelly sandwich, you have the ability to type commands into a programming interface. That is a completely different skill set than abstractly modelling a p,b&j sandwich and how it interacts with the world.
Nov
1
comment Have you ever found yourself using a specific tool in favor of another just because it looks better?
I find it interesting how aesthetics differ between people. I find Eclipse to be hideously ugly. I actually prefer the look of NetBeans. For me, it's NetBeans' incredible slowness that turned me off to it.