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Apr
4
comment Why is XML called a “language” exactly?
An extensible markup language, if you will.
Mar
29
comment Should I add redundant code now just in case it may be needed in the future?
@KidCode This kind of thing is why exceptions exist. Unexpected exceptions crash a program and say very clearly: "Hey, developer, you tried to do something that was nonsense. You have a bug. Please fix."
Mar
15
comment Is it okay for a class to use its own public method?
That you can use a hammer to break your own hand doesn't mean the hammer is bad. It means you need to not do things with it that will break your hand.
Mar
15
comment Is it okay for a class to use its own public method?
All of these problems are reflective more of the code itself being poor quality than of the general principle being flawed. All three cases are just bad code. They can be resolved by some version of "don't do that, do this instead" (perhaps with asking "what do you want exactly?"), and don't call into question the general principle of a class calling its own public methods. The vague potential for an infinite loop is the only one here that gets to the matter as a matter of principle, and even then isn't tackled thoroughly.
Mar
15
comment Is it okay for a class to use its own public method?
These issues sound more like poorly thought-out architecture than a general condemnation of the design principle. (Maybe calling "1 added" is fine every time. If it isn't, we should program differently. Maybe if two methods are trying to exclusive-lock the same resource, they shouldn't call each other, or we wrote them poorly.) Rather than present bad implementations, you may want to focus on more solid arguments that tackle accessing public methods as a universal principle. For example, given good neat code, why's it bad?
Nov
30
comment Is it better to check `c >= '0'` or `c >= 48`?
This doesn't actually count the digits (it just tells you what the length of the string is after you've removed all the digits, which is neither here nor there), but I agree it doesn't actually answer the question. Like, for instance, nobody was asking about removing characters from strings. The question's just asking about the appropriate best-practice way to check whether a character's numeric.
Oct
17
awarded  Yearling
Oct
3
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
2
awarded  Good Answer
May
22
revised Where should my team start with becoming “modern”?
let's just show the question title so that people know what it's about and whether they've already seen it without having to visit or mouseover to read the link URL. (just pasting the question URL will magically produce the title for questions within the same stack site.)
May
22
suggested approved edit on Where should my team start with becoming “modern”?
Oct
23
revised Code that converts a value into a different representation, then converts it back to where it started is bad, but how?
punctuation
Oct
23
suggested approved edit on Code that converts a value into a different representation, then converts it back to where it started is bad, but how?
Oct
17
awarded  Yearling
Sep
1
comment What does it mean when some technology is a “standard”?
@Mathew "I've always taken a standard to be a document published from an authoritative source stating how something should be." - I agree with this sentence in your comment, but your answer presently says the term 'standard' refers to the technology itself. (E.g. according to that, Java is a standard, the Java EE 7 spec isn't a standard.) The previous version said the organisations, such as Oracle or W3C, were what 'standard' meant. Your answer needs to be updated to say what you mean here. Written as is, your answer contains misinformation. :(
Sep
1
revised What does it mean when some technology is a “standard”?
added 70 characters in body
Sep
1
revised What does it mean when some technology is a “standard”?
added 457 characters in body
Sep
1
revised What does it mean when some technology is a “standard”?
added 2945 characters in body
Aug
31
answered What does it mean when some technology is a “standard”?
Feb
1
comment Can a scrum master reprimand his team?
To be fair, I read 'yes they can' as a sort of endorsement for doing so too. It doesn't say 'yes they can, but there's a better way' or anything along those lines, though the post eventually seems to suggest as much.