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Sep
1
comment What does it mean when some technology is a “standard”?
@Mathew "I've always taken a standard to be a document published from an authoritative source stating how something should be." - I agree with this sentence in your comment, but your answer presently says the term 'standard' refers to the technology itself. (E.g. according to that, Java is a standard, the Java EE 7 spec isn't a standard.) The previous version said the organisations, such as Oracle or W3C, were what 'standard' meant. Your answer needs to be updated to say what you mean here. Written as is, your answer contains misinformation. :(
Feb
1
comment Can a scrum master reprimand his team?
To be fair, I read 'yes they can' as a sort of endorsement for doing so too. It doesn't say 'yes they can, but there's a better way' or anything along those lines, though the post eventually seems to suggest as much.
Jul
5
comment Is fewer lines of code always better?
+1 This is a pretty decent answer and I wonder why it was downvoted.
Jul
5
comment Is fewer lines of code always better?
I was not the downvoter, but I'm guessing it's because error checking would be beside the point here: we're assuming we don't need to check for it in this circumstance. I get you're making a separate point that error-checking adding lines of code itself hints that extra lines of code are fine, but in your first sentences you appear to suggest (for argument's sake, I understand) that these statements should be split up and wrapped in their own try/catch blocks or be checked for failure. But there's no call for it here necessarily. That's massive over-engineering!
Jul
2
comment Why do most programming languages only support returning a single value from a function?
In some languages, you'd return a vector with the X and Y coordinate, and returning any useful value would count as "success" with exceptions, possibly carrying that useful value, being used for failure.
Apr
18
comment Should a new programmer focus on a single technology until he's proficient at it?
Yes, and that is a problem. If he's writing code he doesn't understand he's halfway to being a copy-paste programmer, and being a programmer who has no idea what he's doing.
Apr
5
comment Why do you have to manually type variable names while debugging?
In addition, in Visual Studio, you can place your mouse over a variable name in the code and (if it's in scope) you'll see its value pop up. If it's an object, you'll be able to browse its properties and variables (and those of its base) - so no need to search for the variable in the locals field if you can see it right there in the code.
Mar
1
comment What is Pseudocode?
-1 Not helpful. The quote only makes sense among an explanation of pseudocode (missing in this answer). Otherwise, it could be quite misleading. A newbie could wonder: well, C#'s methods are all in English, so that means the C# I'm using is Pseudocode, right...? What do they call it when they're using C# in Germany?
Feb
28
comment What does mathematics have to do with programming?
Mathematics is not the process of solving equations. If the only mathematics you've ever seen is the mathematics taught in school, you have never seen actual mathematics.
Feb
20
comment Is it possible to write application-level logic in an XML or plain text format?
What you are about to do will be another occurrence of the anti-pattern known as the Inner Platform Effect. Abandon hope, all ye who enter here, for many have trodden down this path and created something that was just terrible because no you cannot enable nonprogrammers to program without knowing how to program. They are, inevitably, programming. Don't do it, it's a waste of your time.
Nov
20
comment What is a software prototype?
In addition to Bryan's statements, a prototype can also be something which is never intended to make it to production. E.G.: throw away prototyping.
Sep
12
comment How to teach a script to detect sarcasm?
@Kalle Let's be clear here. Sarcasm is one of the most subtle and advanced devices in spoken language. Even if you're a native English speaker, fully capable of picking up on the subtleties e.g. tone of voice and any relevant contextual information, you'll regularly fail to detect sarcasm. Non-native speakers stand almost no chance whatsoever. Take it to text and even the native speakers stand almost no chance. And you want computers, which struggle to dimly comprehend even the most simple of sentences, to solve this problem? Leave this to someone with a lifetime in speech and text analysis.
Jul
27
comment Titles: Programmer Level I, II, and III
@Job Why should we?
Jul
20
comment What is “The Cloud”? What do I say when people ask if my web service is “on the cloud”?
The definition has been clouded a bit in the midst of all the hype and marketing.
Jul
18
comment Are first person comments distracting and unprofessional?
-1 This isn't the case in most programming environments. In fact, it's probably not even the case in yours - what about whoever takes over your code after you leave the company?
Jul
17
comment Terminology question: Generalize Heisenbug
If you need it for debugging, how about "this bug only appears when debugging"? Coin a term if you like, but that's overcomplicating it.
Jul
9
comment Are first person comments distracting and unprofessional?
-1 because: there isn't a correct way, I find your summary of I/You/We a bit out of touch and I don't understand the last part. Aside: When I say "we" in my comments, I'm not trying to talk like a king - I'm talking to you, the guy reading my code, and walking you through my thoughts side-by-side.
Jul
8
comment Is outsourcing (offshoring) disloyal?
@RichardDesLonde let us continue this discussion in chat
Jul
8
comment Is outsourcing (offshoring) disloyal?
Richard: Not at all. I don't mean to imply that. This isn't a question of intelligence, just surroundings - the conversations we have and listen to give us certain agreements (e.g. the agreement that paying for a resource = charity, or for Australians, the subconscious national agreement that nobody should tell us what to do). So to be more to the point, I don't know what discussions you've been participating in - I sincerely do not. But if I were you I'd uncollapse charity & hiring as if they are equal - they are not (was the person who hired you asking the same questions about you?)
Jul
8
comment Is outsourcing (offshoring) disloyal?
@Richard Still, the way you're talking about it is like hiring someone = donating to a charity or a world cause. Take a look at the language you've used: working locally, cleaning up, assistance to others, giving money to someone to do whatever they think is best to help (emphasis on that second half), insight into what is really happening (as if they must be cleaning up with that money). I don't know what you've been listening to that you have "paying for a resource" collapsed with "donating to a charity", but you really ought to get them distinguished from each other.