1,117 reputation
610
bio website adaptivepatterns.net
location
age 35
visits member for 2 years, 1 month
seen Mar 3 at 16:25

Just following the worldwide JSRenaissance.


Jun
8
awarded  Yearling
Feb
11
answered How to explain to layman the difference between Java and JavaScript
Jan
17
comment Is JavaScript “write once run everywhere”?
Interesting, Palm OS - isn't that Web OS in LG TVs now...
Jan
17
comment Is JavaScript “write once run everywhere”?
Isn't JavaScript independent of the DOM?
Jan
17
revised Is JavaScript “write once run everywhere”?
added 530 characters in body
Jan
16
awarded  Student
Jan
15
asked Is JavaScript “write once run everywhere”?
Jan
8
revised Is there a good reason to avoid node.js for non-realtime web apps?
added 20 characters in body
Jan
8
revised Is there a good reason to avoid node.js for non-realtime web apps?
added 254 characters in body
Jan
8
answered Is there a good reason to avoid node.js for non-realtime web apps?
Jan
8
comment Is there a good reason to avoid node.js for non-realtime web apps?
-1 - Subjective points. "Preferred Syntax", "Documentation not as good", "Obsessive Callbacks", and "Already Done in my language" - are all vague and subjective. We've heard these before. They are debunked. No reason to avoid Node.JS here. Downvote.
Jan
8
comment Is there a good reason to avoid node.js for non-realtime web apps?
+1. Human Resources - and the unwillingness of some to learn JavaScript - is an inconvenient truth. This answer states it well. But, avoiding Node "because people Hate JavaScript" is not the logical progression either. Where would we be technically if we avoided every innovation - that someone else hated? Nowhere. The challenge with node is A) Getting new talent, or B) Educating traditional talent into new talent. To that point - we are seeing JavaScript code schools pop-up everywhere since John Resig's foresight in founding Khan Academy. In short, this is the way of things. +1. Well stated.
Jan
8
comment Is there a good reason to avoid node.js for non-realtime web apps?
-1. I agree this answer will not be valid in 2015. But that is also reasoning for downvote.In essence - the decisions of today ARE the decisions for tomorrow. It nullifies the 8 bullet points above - if we can see that they are only temporarily relevant. 1)Scaling - Walmart Mobile scales, not a reason to avoid Node. 2) Isomorphic JS is no joke. Not a reason. 3) Server Sexyness? Most users know only ux. 4) Best practice is subjective, 5) Not Hot? -subjective 6) Easier? -subjective. 7) Stability is a temporarily relevant point. 8) NPM projected to pass Maven in 2014. No reasons here. Downvote.
Jan
8
comment Is there a good reason to avoid node.js for non-realtime web apps?
+1 - the notion of node.js as a server-side proxy ('in conjunction with traditional web server') gained traction earlier this year and is worth looking into - especially if you have a large traditional architecture to manage. It is a design pattern that seems to make sense for the enterprise. But, it is worth noting - this is not a reason to AVOID Node.js but a reason to use it for specific purpose.
Jan
8
comment Is there a good reason to avoid node.js for non-realtime web apps?
-1 vague. 1)Just because you have N years experience in X - does not mean you should avoid Node.JS. Are you proposing willful ignorance based on experience? And what are the "Generic reasons"? 2) 'other applications that let you write a generic application faster' - is purely subjective. 3) 'other *than "*I hate *JavaScript' - is also subjective and not a valid reason to avoid a flourishing technology. *spelling.
Jun
8
awarded  Yearling
Mar
5
awarded  Caucus
Mar
5
awarded  Constituent
Oct
6
revised How to have a maintainable and manageable Javascript code base
added 4 characters in body
Oct
6
comment How to have a maintainable and manageable Javascript code base
+1 I've also heard buzz on Steal.js. And thanks for the insight on it.