3,154 reputation
828
bio website
location
age 45
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen Jun 13 at 8:23

This sentence can not be used without author's permission.


Mar
18
revised I'm trying to understand hash tables - can someone explain it to me - clearly?
deleted 2 characters in body
Mar
18
revised I'm trying to understand hash tables - can someone explain it to me - clearly?
added 1 characters in body
Mar
18
comment How can you tell if you're really going to be working with the “smartest people”?
@Dunk I do realize that smart people split large projects into smaller ones. Large Systems Suck. This rule is 100% transitive. If you build one, you suck. - Steve Yegge
Mar
18
answered How can you tell if you're really going to be working with the “smartest people”?
Mar
18
answered I'm trying to understand hash tables - can someone explain it to me - clearly?
Feb
22
answered Variable names: underscores, no underscores, or camel case?
Dec
23
comment Is there any reason to use C++ instead of C, Perl, Python, etc.?
@Konrad Rudolph: please see my ohter answer above, but actually you may be right regarding garbage collectors: I'm not sure they can handle reallocations of pointers. But then it depends on the GC. Some very simple ref-counted GC's can do fine (PHP comes to mind).
Dec
23
comment Is there any reason to use C++ instead of C, Perl, Python, etc.?
@Neil G: unfortunately it's not only POD vs non-POD. The problem is that in C++ a vector element can contain pointers to locations that potentially may be affected by realloc(). The only way of keeping these pointers up to date is copying elements (during resizing of a vector), and calling copy ctors. There is no way in C++ for the vector implementation to know if a vector element in fact contains such pointers or not.
Dec
22
comment Is there any reason to use C++ instead of C, Perl, Python, etc.?
no performance overhead at runtime - that's not always true. If you look at STL vector implementations you will see that they don't take the advantage of using realloc() (they can't because of pointers, long story) whereas all higher-level languages that I know can and do use realloc() in vector impl's. This is just one example that it's not that obvious and all black-and-white.
Nov
28
answered C++ code navigation on OS X
Nov
25
comment Why do large IT projects tend to fail or have big cost/schedule overruns?
One curious thing about this problem is that you usually get completely different answers from developers and from managers.
Nov
25
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
24
comment How should I start with Lisp?
How to start with Lisp: open as many parentheses as you can.
Nov
24
revised How to write “good” unit tests?
deleted 5 characters in body
Nov
24
answered How to write “good” unit tests?
Nov
23
comment What mistakes do language writers often make which doom their language?
@Robert Harvey: the one that hasn't been created yet, but it might be underway, who knows. (Well, neither the question was constructive)
Nov
23
comment What mistakes do language writers often make which doom their language?
@acidzombie24: long story short, a good language gives so much flexibility that you can come up with new creative ways of using the language that would surprise even its creator. There's nothing you can do in Java or C# that would surprise their creators. Python is a slighly different story: they have this motto: "There should be one - and preferably only one - obvious way to do it." which smells same kind of dictatorship to me.
Nov
23
comment What mistakes do language writers often make which doom their language?
@Oak: Java was created as a greatly simplified, idiot-proof C++, and that was exactly Java's "killer feature".
Nov
23
answered What mistakes do language writers often make which doom their language?
Nov
20
comment “Gödel, Escher, Bach” still valid today?
@Frank Shearar: looking at GEB:EGB I wonder why he didn't call it BGE:EGB (never finished the book itself to be honest)