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visits member for 2 years, 1 month
seen May 29 at 13:50

Jan
30
comment Is node.js a suitable server platform for financial applications?
OK let me try and restate my concern. JavaScript has one numeric type. When doing sophisticated stuff with numbers, the difference between number representations (both how they're stored and how they're represented in the language) might be of high importance to correctness and efficiency. JavaScript does not give you any flexibility around this - you have to use the one type for everything. This is also a problem with PHP in my opinion. Now it maybe that financial apps don't need that kind of flexibility or precision.
Jan
29
comment Is node.js a suitable server platform for financial applications?
Well I'm no expert but it strikes me that going for a language with built in precision for numbers (doubles, floats, decimals, ints and so on) makes more sense than having to build them into the framework. I have personally struggled with implicit number formatting in JavaScript, but then I prefer a typed language anyway. I am just surprised no one has mentioned it. It is probably the first thing I'd look at.
Jan
28
comment Is node.js a suitable server platform for financial applications?
Why has no one commented on the fact that JavaScript only has 1 numeric type? If you're writing serious mathematical code (I haven't done this myself), wouldn't you want a bit more flexibility and power than just having one floating point type?
Jul
1
comment Are programmers bad testers?
No one is aware of any research or data on this issue?
Jul
1
comment Are programmers bad testers?
I think this answer hit the nail on the head when it points out that "If you've written the code, you (should) have already thought of as many ways as possible that things could go wrong, and have dealt with them."
Jun
29
comment Are programmers bad testers?
I actually agree, but what I want to know is what evidence there is to say that this is true most of the time and for most developers. If I want to give general advice to people that developers make bad testers (or even bad testers of their own code), then I should have evidence for that assertion beyond my own experience, if at all possible.
Jun
29
comment Are programmers bad testers?
Thanks for asking that. I updated my question to say what I consider testing to be. Basically, testing is stuff that happens after the software has been built and deployed, not during development (like unit testing) or as part of a development methodology (like peer review).
Jun
15
comment I'm doing 90% maintenance and 10% development, is this normal?
This question is not about salaries. It is about whether or not the job of a programmer includes maintaining code, and if it's a reasonable expectation that it makes up 90% of the work of a programmer. The answer is definitely yes, programmers maintain code. If TiredProgrammer wants answers about management or salaries, he should ask about that.