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Jul
18
accepted What are the bytes between the MSB and LSB named?
Jul
18
comment Is there any practical use for the empty type in Common Lisp?
Are you asking whether nil can be dissociated from the concept of the empty type, or are you asking whether the language can do without nil completely?
Jul
18
revised What are the bytes between the MSB and LSB named?
Took out the portion of the problem which was asking for opinions and left it with the core question: "Are there standard names for these bytes?"
Jul
16
comment What are the bytes between the MSB and LSB named?
@SJuan76 I considered using that bit-shifting method and might end up doing so as it looks like it'll make the reading code better (since I can loop through the reads instead of calling them out individually).
Jul
16
comment What are the bytes between the MSB and LSB named?
What I was going to do was use a union of a 32-bit int and a struct which contained the individual bytes -- with the bytes in the struct ordered according to endianness (intel: little). I might just end up forgoing naming and do the add & bit-shift method of constructing the int.
Jul
16
comment What are the bytes between the MSB and LSB named?
@mattnz I agree and w.r.t. an answer here it would be good to have one that covered more than just 32-bit ints. For me specifically, the data I'm retrieving (that prompted this question) has been specified to be a time_t-like 32-bit timestamp for system up-time in seconds.
Jul
15
comment What are the bytes between the MSB and LSB named?
@SJuan76 hm, makes sense. I'll wait to see if I get any other good answers, but if you would like to post that as an answer I'll definitely upvote (and probably accept) it. Also, I assume "first" = LSB?
Jul
15
asked What are the bytes between the MSB and LSB named?
Jul
14
revised Is it a good idea to “#define me (*this)”?
Corrected word choice
Jul
14
suggested suggested edit on Is it a good idea to “#define me (*this)”?
Jul
12
answered Is Haskell appropriate for Signal Processing, Communication Systems and Information Theory?
Jul
11
comment What's the proper way of dealing with a global file path?
I always struggle with naming things myself and have been a bit of a stickler about it recently (much to the chagrin of some coworkers). It struck me the other day that not being able to come up with a good name might be indicative of not having reduced the concepts I'm working with into manageable bits -- I'll have to watch out for this and see if it's the case.
Jul
9
comment What's the proper way of dealing with a global file path?
@Carcigenicate One thing you might want to consider is naming: if you're passing the path as an argument then you'd want to use changePath, but if you're not passing it as an argument and the changed version might make more sense as changedPath, making it more of a constant itself (assuming it didn't take any more arguments than the path).
Jul
9
comment What's the proper way of dealing with a global file path?
@Carcigenicate Most of my programs grow, so I tend to make things parameterized, but if that's not the case for yours then a global constant should be fine -- this is just one of those design decisions that needs to be made. (You can always refactor later.)
Jul
9
answered What's the proper way of dealing with a global file path?
Jul
9
comment What's the proper way of dealing with a global file path?
@AndrewHoffman The question is whether or not to have a function depend on a variable as a global constant or to have it be passed in as a function argument.
Jun
19
awarded  Yearling
Jun
5
comment Object-Oriented equivalent of LISP's progn function?
@Giorgio Well said; when writing my comment about being able to have side-effects I was thinking mostly variable mutation or IO deep in the bowels of the code.
Jun
5
comment Object-Oriented equivalent of LISP's progn function?
@RobertHarvey Yes, side-effects is the main use I can see. I usually use progn (do in Clojure) to do side-effects like printing to the command line (which I hack in while debugging). You can have side-effects in Lisp since it is not a purely functional language -- some argue it's not functional at all, just conducive to a functional style; I like to consider it functional since that's the style I use when I program in it.
Jun
5
answered Object-Oriented equivalent of LISP's progn function?